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Sat, 17 Jan 2015

Commercial Snoopy Launch! [ ShadowLightly ]

Hello world!


We've been busy squireling away on a much requested project - a commercial Snoopy offering. We've called it ShadowLightly, and we'd like to invite you to join the beta explorer program. We're going to offer ten 3-month trials to the site (you'd need to buy sensors / build your own), and in return we'd ask that you help us debug any issues. To apply, please email explorer@shadowlightly.com - introduce yourself, and tell us a little about why you'd like to join the program.


To those who missed the Snoopy party: it's a distributed, tracking, profiling, and data interception framework. It's all open source and you can run your own setup for non-commercial purposes. Here's some more info:
http://www.sensepost.com/blog/10754.html
http://www.sensepost.com/blog/11042.html


How does this ShadowLightly thing work? You'd create an account on our ShadowLightly.com site, register your sensors, run your sensors uploading their data to our server, and then explore the data in both the website and in Maltego. We've built TDS transforms to query the remote data.


Here's a video which may explain it all better:


ShadowLightly Demo


We're looking forward to working with you!

Mon, 3 Nov 2014

Are you the intern we've been looking for?

intern


 


We're looking for an intern to join our newly formed 'Innovation Centre' arm of SensePost/SecureData. Have a read below for some more information, and drop us a mail if you're interested or would like some more info (glenn@sensepost.com).




The purpose of the Innovation Centre is to offer an incubation hub through which new ideas, concepts and other technical and business innovations can be collected & captured and then rapidly described, prioritised researched, prototyped, tested, advocated and transitioned into the business.


About the Intern Position:


The ideal candidate should have a computer science or similar background, but equivalent work experience or self taught candidates will also be considered. The following specific requirements are required:


* Familiarity with at least one scripting language, preferably Python
* Fundamental understanding of networking
* Linux experience
* A positive attitude with a capable problem solving capabilities


The following points would be seen as a bonus:
* Strong computer science degree
* Industry experience (e.g. holiday internship).
* Web development capabilities
* Security knowledge / experience
* Experience with embedded or similar systems (e.g. Pi, Arduino, etc)


Whilst SensePost is an information security company, this specific internship does not directly relate to an info-sec position, but the projects worked on will relate to info-sec. The internship is for placement in the Innovation Centre. Day to day tasks are likely to include:


* Writing PoC scripts
* Providing support to InnoCentre analysts (e.g. writing Maltego plugins, debugging issues, testing new hardware/software).
* Liaising with partners/clients

Tue, 5 Aug 2014

SensePost partners with Paterva to offer improved security intelligence

SENSEPOST PNG on clear
We've been big fans of Maltego and the team at Paterva for a very long time now, and we frequently use this powerful tool for all kinds of fun and interesting stuff, like

We go way back with Andrew and Roelof, who was in fact a founder of SensePost, so today we're super excited to be able to announce a new, strengthened partnership with them under which we have been accredited as an Approved Maltego Solutions Provider. Basically this means the that with Paterva's help we plan to use the powerful Maltego toolset to become better at our job - that is to provide information and information systems to our customer with which they can make sound security decisions. Here's the official news:
SensePost today is proud to announce the completion of a contract that will see the company recognized as the world's first “Approved Maltego Solution Provider” (AMSP) and the exclusive provider of this kind in the UK and Southern Africa.


SensePost was founded in 2000 and has developed into one of the worlds leading Information Security Services companies with offices in London, Cape Town and Pretoria. As trusted advisors it has always been our mission to provide our customers with insight, information and systems to enable them to make strong decisions about Information Security that support their business performance. Whilst this mission has traditionally expressed itself in technical security analysis services like Vulnerability Assessment and Penetration Testing we recognise that the threat landscape is constantly changing and that new and more complex realities necessitate the use of sophisticated new skills, tools and techniques with which to support our clients.


“This strategic alliance perfectly fits the ‘Assess-Detect-Protect-Respond' framework that drives the way we design, sell and deliver our service. It's the perfect evolution of our growing services offering.” says Etienne Greef, CEO of the SensePost group holding company SecureData, who's strategy is at the core of this new initiative.


‘Maltego', built by Paterva, is a powerful suite of software tools used for data mining, link analysis and data visualization, giving the user the ability to extract large volumes of data from diverse sources and then analyze it to understand the patterns and relationships it reveals. In the modern digital age these techniques are used to convert data into information and thereby extract concrete value that can be used for effective decision-making.


Maltego is a highly regarded and popular platform used extensively in Open Source Intelligence Gathering, Infrastructure Analysis for Penetration Testing, Cyber Attack Analysis, Fraud Detection and Investigation, Security Intelligence, Information Security Management, Research and more.


This partnership between SensePost and Paterva (who produce the Maltego software) builds on the companies' shared roots and intellectual heritage and will allow both companies to serve their customers and fulfil their respective missions better.


As an AMSP SensePost will be authorised to provide integration, consulting, support and training for the Maltego tools with full endorsement, support and assistance directly from Paterva. This new capability, combined with an existing wealth of information security skills and experience, uniquely positions SensePost to advise and support clients seeking to exploit the unique strategic advantage the Maltego toolset can offer.


More information on our services and capabilities in this space will follow with our official "launch" in a few weeks time. In the mean, here's a brief summary of our new offering.

Thu, 19 Jun 2014

Release the hounds! Snoopy 2.0

theHounds
Friday the 13th seemed like as good a date as any to release Snoopy 2.0 (aka snoopy-ng). For those in a rush, you can download the source from GitHub, follow the README.md file, and ask for help on this mailing list. For those who want a bit more information, keep reading.

What is Snoopy?


Snoopy is a distributed, sensor, data collection, interception, analysis, and visualization framework. It is written in a modular format, allowing for the collection of arbitrary signals from various devices via Python plugins.


It was originally released as a PoC at 44Con 2012, but this version is a complete re-write, is 99% Python, modular, and just feels better. The 'modularity' is possibly the most important improvement, for reasons which will become apparent shortly.


Tell me more!


We've presented our ongoing work with snoopy at a bunch of conferences under the title 'The Machines that Betrayed Their Masters'. The general synopsis of this research is that we all carry devices with us that emit wireless signals that could be used to:

  • Uniquely identify the device / collection of devices

  • Discover information about the owner (you!)


This new version of snoopy extends this into other areas of RFID such as; Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GSM, NFC, RFID, ZigBee, etc. The modular design allows each of these to be implemented as a python module. If you can write Python code to interface with a tech, you can slot it into a snoopy-ng plugin.


We've also made it much easier to run Snoopy by itself, rather than requiring a server to sync to as the previous version did. However, Snoopy is still a distributed framework and allows the deployment of numerous Snoopy devices over some large area, having them all sync their data back to one central server (or numerous hops through multiple devices and/or servers). We've been working on other protocols for data synchronisation too - such as XBee. The diagram below illustrates one possible setup:


Architecture Diagram

OK - but how do I use it?


I thought you'd never ask! It's fairly straight forward.

Hardware Requirements


Snoopy should run on most modern computers capable of running Linux, with the appropriate physical adapters for the protocols you're interested in. We've tested it on:

  • Laptop

  • Nokia N900 (with some effort)

  • Raspberry Pi (SnooPi!)

  • BeagleBone Black (BeagleSnoop!)


In terms of hardware peripherals, we've been experimenting with the following:
TechnologyHardwareRange
Wi-FiAWUS 036H100m
BluetoothUbertooth50m
ZigBeeDigi Xbee1km to 80kms
GSMRTL2832U SDR35kms
RFIDRFidler15cm
NFCACR122U10cm


The distances can be increased with appropriate antennas. More on that in a later blog post.

Software Requirements


Essentially a Linux environment is required, but of more importance are the dependencies. These are mostly Python packages. We've tested Snoopy on Kali 1.x, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. We managed to get it working on Maemo (N900) too. We're investigating getting it running on OpenWRT/ddWRT. Please let us know if you have success.

Installation


It should be as simple as:
git clone https://github.com/sensepost/snoopy-ng.git
cd snoopy-ng
bash ./install.sh

Usage


Run Snoopy with the command 'snoopy', and accept the License Agreement. We'd recommend you refer to the README.md file for more information, but here are a few examples to get you going:


1. To save data from the wireless, sysinfo, and heartbeat plugins locally:

snoopy -v -m wifi:iface=wlanX,mon=True -m sysinfo -m heartbeat -d <drone name> -l <location name>

2. To sync data from a client to a server:


Server:

snoopy_auth --create <drone name> # Create account
snoopy -v -m server # Start server plugin

Client:
snoopy -v -m wifi:iface=mon0 -s http://<server hostname>:9001/ -d <drone name> -l <location name> -k

Data Visualization


Maltego is the preferred tool to perform visualisation, and where the beauty of Snoopy is revealed. See the README.md for instructions on how to use it.

I heard Snoopy can fly?


You heard right! Well, almost right. He's more of a passenger on a UAV:



There sure is a lot of stunt hacking in the media these days, with people taking existing hacks and duct-taping them to a cheap drone for media attention. We were concerned to see stories on snoopy airborne take on some of this as the message worked its way though the media. What's the benefit of having Snoopy airborne, then? We can think of a few reasons:


  1. Speed: We can canvas a large area very quickly (many square kilometres)

  2. Stealth: At 80m altitude the UAV is out of visual/audible range

  3. Security: It's possible to bypass physical security barriers (walls, men with guns, dogs)

  4. TTL (Tag, Track, Locate): It's possible to search for a known signature, and follow it


We're exploring the aerial route a whole lot. Look out for our DefCon talk in August for more details.

Commercial Use


The license under which Snoopy is released forbids gaining financially from its use (see LICENSE.txt). We have a separate license available for commercial use, which includes extra functionality such as:

  • Syncing data via XBee

  • Advanced plugins

  • Extra/custom transforms

  • Web interface

  • Prebuilt drones


Get in contact (glenn@sensepost.com / research@sensepost.com) if you'd like to engage with us.

Fri, 13 Jun 2014

Using Maltego to explore threat & vulnerability data

This blog post is about the process we went through trying to better interpret the masses of scan results that automated vulnerability scanners and centralised logging systems produce. A good example of the value in getting actionable items out of this data is the recent Target compromise. Their scanning solutions detected the threat that lead to their compromise, but no humans intervened. It's suspected that too many security alerts were being generated on a regular basis to act upon.


The goal of our experiment was to steer away from the usual data interrogation questions of "What are the top N vulnerabilities my scanner has flagged with a high threat?" towards questions like "For how many of my vulnerabilities do public exploits exist?". Near the end of this exercise we stumbled across this BSides talk "Stop Fixing All The Things". Theses researchers took a similar view-point: "As security practitioners, we care about which vulnerabilities matter". Their blog post and video are definitely worth having a look at.


At SensePost we have a Managed Vulnerability Scanning service (MVS). It incorporates numerous scanning agents (e.g. Nessus, Nmap, Netsparker and a few others), and exposes an API to interact with the results. This was our starting point to explore threat related data. We could then couple this data with remote data sources (e.g. CVE data, exploit-db.com data).


We chose to use Maltego to explore the data as it's an incredibly powerful data exploration and visualisation tool, and writing transforms is straight forward. If you'd like to know more about Maltego here are some useful references:


What we ended up building were:

  • Transforms to explore our MVS data

  • A CVE / exploit-db.com API engine

  • Transforms to correlate between scanner data and the created APIs

  • Maltego Machines to combine our transforms


So far our API is able to query a database populated from CVE XML files and data from www.exploit-db.com (they were kind enough to give us access to their CVE inclusive data set). It's a standalone Python program that pulls down the XML files, populates a local database, and then exposes a REST API. We're working on incorporating other sources - threat feeds, other logging/scanning systems. Let us know if you have any ideas. Here's the API in action:


Parsing CVE XML data and exposing REST API
Parsing CVE XML data and exposing REST API


Querying a CVE. We see 4 public exploits are available.
Querying a CVE. We see 4 public exploits are available.


It's also worth noting that for the demonstrations that follow we've obscured our clients' names by applying a salted 'human readable hash' to their names. A side effect is that you'll notice some rather humorous entries in the images and videos that follow.


Jumping into the interesting results, these are some of the tasks that we can perform:


  • Show me all hosts that have a critical vulnerability within the last 30 days

  • Show me vulnerable hosts for which public exploit code exists

  • Show me all hosts for which a vulnerability exists that has the word 'jmx-console' in the description

  • Show me all hosts on in my DMZ that have port 443 open

  • Given a discovered vulnerability on a host, show me all other hosts with the same vulnerability

  • Show me a single diagram depicting every MVS client, weighted by the threat of all scans within the last week

  • Show me a single diagram depicting every MVS client, weighted by the availability of public exploit code

  • Given a CPE, show me all hosts that match it


Clicking the links in the above scenarios will display a screenshot of a solution. Additionally, two video demonstrations with dialog are below.


Retrieving all recent vulnerabilities for a client 'Bravo Tango', and checking one of them to see if there's public exploit code available.
Retrieving all recent vulnerabilities for a client 'Bravo Tango', and checking one of them to see if there's public exploit code available.


Exploring which clients/hosts have which ports open
Exploring which clients/hosts have which ports open


In summary, building 'clever tools' that allow you to combine human insight can be powerful. An experiences analyst with the ability to ask the right questions, and building tools that allows answers to be easily extracted, yields actionable tasks in less time. We're going to start using this approach internally to find new ways to explore the vulnerability data sets of our scanning clients and see how it goes.


In the future, we're working on incorporating other data sources (e.g. LogRhythm, Skybox). We're also upgrading our MVS API - you'll notice a lot of the Maltego queries are cumbersome and slow due to its current linear exploration approach.


The source code for the API, the somewhat PoC Maltego transforms, and the MVS (BroadView) API can be downloaded from our GitHub page, and the MVS API from here. You'll need a paid subscription to incorporate the exploit-db.com data, but it's an initiative definitely worth supporting with a very fair pricing model. They do put significant effort in correlating CVEs. See this page for more information.


Do get in touch with us (or comment below) if you'd like to know more about the technical details, chat about the API (or expand on it), if this is a solution you'd like to deploy, or if you'd just like to say "Hi".