Grey bar Blue bar
Share this:

Fri, 9 Mar 2012

Foot printing – Finding your target...

We were asked to contribute an article to PenTest magazine, and chose to write up an introductory how-to on footprinting. We've republished it here for those interested.

Network foot printing is, perhaps, the first active step in the reconnaissance phase of an external network security engagement. This phase is often highly automated with little human interaction as the techniques appear, at first glance, to be easily applied in a general fashion across a broad range of targets. As a security analyst, footprinting is also one of the most enjoyable parts of my job as I attempt to outperform the automatons; it is all about finding that one target that everybody forgot about or did not even know they had, that one old IIS 5 webserver that is not used, but not powered off.

With this article I am going to share some of the steps, tips and tricks that pentesters and hackers alike use when starting on a engagement.

Approach

As with most things in life having a good approach to a problem will yield better results and overtime as your approach is refined you will consume less time while getting better results. By following a methodology, your footprinting will become more repeatable and thus reliable. A basic footprining methodology covers reconnaissance, DNS mining, various information services (e.g. whois, Robtex, routes), network registration information and active steps such as SSL host enumeration.

While the temptation exists to merely feed a domain name into a tool or script and take the output as your completed footprint, this will not yield a passable footprint for two reasons. Firstly, a single tool will not have access to all the disparate information sources that one should consult, and secondly the footprinting process is inherently iterative and continuous. A footprint is almost never complete; instead, a fork of the footprint data provides the best current view of the target, but the information could change tomorrow as new sites are brought online, or old sites are taken offline. As a new piece of data is found that could expand the footprint, a new iteration of the footprinting process triggers with that datum as the seed, and the results are combined with all discovered information.

Know your target

The very first thing to do is to get to know your target organisation. What they do, who they do it for, who does it for them, where they do it from - both online and in the kinetic world, what community or charity work they are involved in. This will give you an insight into what type of network/infrastructure you can expect. Reading public announcements, financial reports and any other documents published on or by the organisation might also yield interesting results. Any organisation that must publish regular reports (e.g. listed companies), provide a treasure trove of information for understanding the target's core business units, corporate hierarchy and lines of business. All these become very useful when selecting targets.

Dumpster diving, if you are up for it and have physical access to the target, means sifting through trash to get useful information, but in recent times social media can provide us with even more. Sites like LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter can provide you with lists of employees and projects that the organisation is involved with and perhaps even information about third party products and suppliers that are in use.

One should even keep an eye out for evidence of previous breaches or loss of credentials. It has become common place for hackers to post information about security breaches on sites like pastebin.com. The most likely evidence would be credentials in the form of corporate emails and passwords being reused on unrelated sites that are hacked, and have their user databases uploaded. In addition, developers use sites like Pastebin to share code, ideas and patches, and if you are lucky you might just find a little snippet of code sitting out in the open on Pastebin, that will give you the edge.

DNS

“The Domain Name System (DNS) is a hierarchical distributed naming system for computers, services, or any resource connected to the Internet or a private network.” — WikiPedia

In a nutshell, DNS is used to convert computer names to their numeric addresses.

Start by enumerating every possible domain owned by the target. This is where the information from the initial reconnaissance phase comes in handy, as the target's website will likely point to external domains of interest and also help you guess at possible names. With a list of most discovered domains in hand, move on to a TLD (Top level domain) expand. TLDs are the highest level subdomains in DNS; .com, .net, .za, .mobi are all examples of TLDs (The Mozilla Organization maintains a list of TLDs https://wiki.mozilla.org/TLD_List).

In the next step, we take a discovered discovered domain and check to see if there are any other domains with the same name, but with a different TLD. For example, if the target has the domain victim.com, test whether the domains victim.net, victim.info, victim.org etc. exist and if they exist check to see if they are owned by our target organization. To determine whether a domain exists or not, one should examine the SOA (start of authority) DNS record for the domain. Using commands like nslookup under Microsoft Windows or the dig/host commands under most of the *nix family will reveal SOA records.

Using dig, “dig zonetransfer.me soa”.

?

Figure 1: Using dig to get the SOA (Start of authority) record for a domain

If, by verifying the SOA, it is confirmed that the domain exists, then the next step is to track down who it belongs to. At this point the whois service is called upon. ‘Whois' is simply a registry that contains the information of the owner of a domain. Note that it is not entirely reliable and certainly not consistent. The following very simple query “whois zonetransfer.me” provides us with the owner of the domain “zonetransfer.me” detail.

Figure 2: Using whois to get the domain owner detail

After finding domains, running them through a TLD expansion and verifying their whois information, it is time to track down hosts. First we need to get the NS or name server records for the domains. Again using “dig zonetransfer.me ns” returns a list of all the name servers used by this domain. In many cases the name server will not be part of the target's network and is often out-of-scope, but they will still be used in the next step.

DNS yields much interesting information, but the default methods for extracting information from foreign servers effectively relies on a brute force. However, DNS supports a trick where all DNS information for a zone can be downloaded if the server allows it, and this is called a “zone transfer”. When enabled, they are extremely useful as they negate the need for guessing or brute-forcing; sadly they are commonly disabled. Still, given the usefulness of zone transfers it is always worth testing for. Zone transfers should be performed against all the name servers that are specified in the NS records of a domain as the data contained in each name server should be the same, but the security configuration might be different. Using dig, the following command will attempt to perform a zone transfer “dig axfr @ns12.zoneedit.com zonetransfer.me”

Figure 3: Performing a zone transfer using dig

As mentioned previously, zone transfers are not that common. When we cannot download the zone file, there are a couple of other tricks that might work. One is to brute force or guess host names: by using a long list of common hostnames one can test for names such as “fw.victim.com”, “intranet.victim.com”, “mail.victim.com” and so on. The names can be commonly seen hostnames, generated names when computers are assigned numeric or algorithmic names, or from sets of related names such as characters from a book series. When brute forcing DNS, be sure to check the following DNS records: CNAME, A and AAAA. Again this is easy using a tool like dig. “dig www.google.com a” produces the DNS configuration for www.google.com, note that the hostname www.google.com actually has multiple DNS entries, one CNAME record, and multiple A records. Looking at the IP addresses it is clear that there are several different hosts (2 in the screenshot below).

Figure 4: Using dig to get the a record for a host entry

Doing this manually seems easy and quick, (and it is) but if we want to brute force or guess many host names, then this will take too long. Of course, it is easy enough to script these commands to automate the process; however there are existing tools written specifically for this purpose. One of the most popular tools, Fierce, is a perl script written by RSnake (http://ha.ckers.org/fierce/), which is easy to use and has many useful functions. Additionally, there are tools like Paterva's Maltego and SensePost's Yeti (a tool I wrote) which provide graphical tools for this purpose.

If we happen to have a list of IP addresses or IP netblocks of the target, then a further DNS trick is to convert the addresses into hostnames using reverse lookups to get the PTR record entry. This is useful since reverse records are easily brute forced in IPv4. Bear in mind that DNS does not require a PTR record (reverse entry) or that entries in the reverse zone must match entries in the forward zone. But the result can give you an idea of whether the host is a shared host, owned and hosted by the company or just remote hosted.

To test once more, try using dig, “dig 104.66.194.173.in-addr.arpa ptr”. While this too can be easily automated, the previously mentioned tools will also handle PTR records.

Search engines:

DNS interrogation and mining forms the bulk foot printing, but thanks to modern search engines like Google and Bing, finding targets has become much easier.

Apart from the normal searching for your target, as you would do in your initial phase, you can actually use the data that you discovered during the course of the DNS mining to try and get further information using search engines. Bing from Microsoft provides us with two really useful search operators: “ip:” and “site:”. When using the “ip:” operator, Bing will return a list of hosts that it has indexed that resolve to the IP address that you have specified. Alternatively the “site:” operator when used with a domain name, will return a list of host names that have been indexed by the search engine and belong to the domain specified. Quick and easy, and Bing also provides you with a very simple free API that you can use to automate these searches.

Address mapping

All this fuss with DNS is important, but it is only useful insofar as they lead us to addresses. The next step is discovering where the target exists within the IP address space. Luckily useful tools and resources exist to help us uncover these ranges, by automating a combination of manual techniques such as whois querying, traceroute and netblock calculators. In the previous section the whois tool was used to get the domain owner information. The same tool can be used to discover the ownership/assignment details of a specific IP address. Let's take www.facebook.com; one of the IP addresses that it resolves to is 69.63.190.10. “whois 69.63.190.10” produces the following output.

Figure 5: Getting the netblock and owner using whois

From the whois output we get really useful information. First is a netblock range 69.63.176.0-69.63.190.255 as well as the owner of this net block, namely Facebook, Inc. In this case we are lucky and the netblock is registered to facebook, but often you will only get the network service provider to which the netblock is allocated to. In that case, you will have to query the service provider in order to gain more info about the specific netblock. Online resources can also be very useful, for example ARIN (American Registry for Internet Numbers) or any of the other regional registries (RIPE, AfriNIC, APNIC and LACNIC) provides a reverse whois search interface where one can search for organisation names and other terms, even performing wild card searches. Giving Facebook a second look, we try a search on the reverse whois interface found at http://whois.arin.net/ with the term “facebook”, and get a list of five additional network ranges.

Figure 6: Search results for ARIN reverse whois

SSL Certificates

Lastly, we turn to SSL. SSL may be more familiar as a “protection” against nasty eavesdroppers and men-in-the-middle, but it is useful for footprinters. How? It is really simple actually, one of the security checks performed by browsers when deciding on the validity of a SSL certificate is whether the Common Name contained in the certificate matches the DNS name of the host requested from the browser. How does this help? Say a list of IP addresses has been produced; the next step would be to perform a reverse lookup of all these addresses. However, if no reverse entry is present and Bing has no record of the IP, then some creativity is called for. If an HTTPS website is hosted on that address then simply browse to that IP address and, when presented with the invalid certificate error, message, look for the “real” host name.

Figure 7: Firefox reporting the common name contained in a SSL certificate for a host

Again, this is something that is easily automated, so we have included a module in Yeti to actually do this for you.

Conclusion

Foot printing might at first glance appear to be simple and mundane, but the more you do it, the more you will realise that very few organisations have a handle on exactly what they have and what they present to the Internet. As the Internet and networks evolve so will the way companies and organisations use it, and so will their footprint. A year-old footprint could be hopelessly outdated, and ongoing footprinting helps organisations maintain a current view of their threat landscape.

With the ongoing move away from local infrastructure to hosted infrastructure, the footprint expands, spreads and grows, and so will our quest to find as much as possible.

Wed, 7 Mar 2012

Mobile Security - Observations from the developing world

By the year 2015 sub-Saharan Africa will have more people with mobile network access than with access to electricity at home.
This remarkable fact from a 2011 MobileMonday report [1] came to mind again as I read an article just yesterday about the introduction of Mobile Money in the UK: By the start of next year, every bank customer in the country may have the ability to transfer cash between bank accounts, using an app on their mobile phone. [2]

I originally came across the MobileMonday report while researching the question of mobility and security in Africa for a conference I was asked to present at [3]. In this presentation I examine the global growth and impact of the so-called mobile revolution and then its relevance to Africa, before looking at some of the potential security implications this revolution will have.

The bit about the mobile revolution is easy: According to the Economist there will be 10 billion mobile devices connected to the Internet by 2020, and the number of mobile devices will surpass the number of PCs and laptops by this year already. The mobile-only Internet population will grow 56-fold from 14 million at the end of 2010 to 788 million by the end of 2015. Consumerization - the trend for new information technology to emerge first in the consumer market and then spread into business organizations, resulting in the convergence of the IT and consumer electronics industries - implies that the end-user is defining the roadmap for these technologies as manufacturers, networks and businesses scramble desperately to absorb their impact.

Africa, languishing behind in so many other respects, is right there on the rushing face of this new wave, as my initial quote illustrates. In fact the kind of mobile payment technology referred to in the BBC article is already quite prevalent in our home markets in Africa and we're frequently engaged to test mobile application security in various forms. In my presentation for example, I make reference to m-Pesa - the mobile payments system launched in Kenya and now mimicked in South Africa also. Six million people in Kenya use m-Pesa, and more than 5% of that country's annual GDP is moved to and fro directly from mobile to mobile. There are nearly five times the number of m-Pesa outlets than the total number of PostBank branches, post offices, bank branches, and automated teller machines (ATMs) in the country combined.

Closer to home in South Africa, it is estimated that the number of people with mobile phones outstrips the number of people with fixed-line Internet connections by a factor of ten! And this impacts our clients and their businesses directly: Approximately 44% of urban cellphone users in South Africa now make use of mobile banking services. The reasoning is clear: Where fixed infrastructure is poor mobile will dominate, and where the mobile dominates mobile services will soon follow. Mobile banking, mobile wallets, mobile TV and mobile social networking and mobile strong-authentication systems are all already prevalent here in South Africa and are already bringing with them the expected new array of security challenges. Understanding this is one of the reasons our customers come to us.

In my presentation I describe the Mobile Threat Model as having three key facets:

  • Security: The challenge of ensuring Confidentiality, Integrity and Authenticity for the data and transactions on the device;
  • Privacy: The implications of mobility (and especially convergence) for citizens and their rights to talk, move, think and act unobserved; and
  • Control: The challenge presented by the mobile revolution to governments fighting crime, gangsterism and terrorism.
All of these issues are real and complex, but I'm restricting myself to the security question here. I encourage readers to peruse the presentation itself for a full breakdown of the Threat Model because for this article I think it suffices to consider just the conclusion of my presentation, and it's this:

The technical security issues we discover on mobile devices and mobile applications today are really no different from what we've been finding in other environments for years. There are some interesting new variations and interesting new attack vectors, but it's really just a new flavor of the same thing. But there are four attributes of the modern mobile landscape that combine to present us with an entirely new challenge:

Firstly, mobiles are highly connected. The mobile phone is permanently on some IP network and by extension permanently on the Internet. However, it's also connected via GSM and CDMA; it's connected with your PC via USB, your Bluetooth headset and your GPS, and soon it will be connected with other devices in your vicinity via NFC. Never before in our history have communications been so converged, and all via the wallet-sized device in your pocket right now!

Secondly, the mobile device is deeply integrated. On or through this platform is everything anyone would ever want to know about you: Your location, your phone calls, your messages, your personal data, your photos, your location, your location history and your entire social network. Indeed, in an increasing number of technical paradigms, your mobile device is you! Moreover, the device has the ability to collect, store and transmit everything you say, see and hear, and everywhere you go!

Thirdly, as I've pointed out, mobile devices are incredibly widely distributed. Basically, everyone has one or soon will. And, we're rapidly steering towards a homogenous environment defined by IOS and Google's Android. Imagine the effect this has on the value of an exploit or attack vector. Finally, the mobile landscape is still being very, very poorly managed. Except for the Apple AppStore, and recent advances by Google to manage the Android market, there is extremely little by way of standardization, automated patching or central management to be seen. Most devices, once deployed, will stay in commission for years to come and so security mistakes being made now are likely to become a nightmare for us in the future.

Thus, the technical issues well known from years of security testing in traditional environments are destined to prevail in mobile, and we're already seeing this in the environments we've tested. This reality, combined with how connected, integrated, distributed and poorly managed these platforms are, suggests that careless decisions today could cost us very dearly in the future...

[1] Mobile Africa Report 2011, Regional Hubs of Excellence and Innovation by Dr Madanmohan Rao, Research Project Director, MobileMonday March 2011

[2] http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17115946

[3] http://prezi.com/as-szhrug5zr/examining-the-impact-of-the-adoption-of-mobile-devices-throughout-africa-and-the-subsequent-rise-of-security-related-risks-sensepost-information-security/

Thu, 3 Nov 2011

Mobile Security Summit 2011

This week, Charl van der Walt and I (Saurabh) spoke at Mobile Security Summit organized by IIR (http://www.iir.co.za/detail.php?e=2389).

Charl was the keynote speaker and presented his insight on the impact of the adoption of mobile devices throughout Africa and the subsequent rise of security related risks. During his talk, he addressed the following:

  • Understanding the need for mobile security to be taken seriously in Africa
  • Analysing the broader implications for the user and the company
  • The types of attacks occurring against mobile devices
  • What does the future of mobile security look like and what are the potential threats to users?
  • Understanding the particular threats posed by smartphones and other portable devices, e.g. tablets
The presentation can be accessed via link below:

http://prezi.com/as-szhrug5zr/examining-the-impact-of-the-adoption-of-mobile-devices-throughout-africa-and-the-subsequent-rise-of-security-related-risks-sensepost-information-security/

I spoke on iPhone and Android security, demonstrating the ease with which mobile security can be breached and presented some live demos. Below is the agenda of my talk:

  • Why everyone rants about SmartPhone security
  • Understanding iPhone Application layout
  • Decrypting iPhone apps & what can we achieve
  • Android Architecture
  • Android Permission Model & Sandbox
  • Analyzing Android Apps - Deep sea diving
  • Practical Attacks on Android
  • Demos
  • Introducing Manifestor.py
I also released a Python script, Manifestor.py, which can be used by Penetration testers and Android geeks to find permission-based flaws in Android applications. The script is in early stage of development and will be enhanced in near future. A working copy of this script can be downloaded from link below:

http://www.sensepost.com/labs/tools/poc/manifestor

The original presentation can be downloaded from link below:

http://www.slideshare.net/sensepost/outsmarting-smartphones

Squinting at Security Drivers and Perspective-based Biases

While doing some thinking on threat modelling I started examining what the usual drivers of security spend and controls are in an organisation. I've spent some time on multiple fronts, security management (been audited, had CIOs push for priorities), security auditing (followed workpapers and audit plans), pentesting (broke in however we could) and security consulting (tried to help people fix stuff) and even dabbled with trying to sell some security hardware. This has given me some insight (or at least an opinion) into how people have tried to justify security budgets, changes, and findings or how I tried to. This is a write up of what I believe these to be (caveat: this is my opinion). This is certainly not universalisable, i.e. it's possible to find unbiased highly experienced people, but they will still have to fight the tendencies their position puts on them. What I'd want you to take away from this is that we need to move away from using these drivers in isolation, and towards more holistic risk management techniques, of which I feel threat modelling is one (although this entry isn't about threat modelling).

Auditors

The tick box monkeys themselves, they provide a useful function, and are so universally legislated and embedded in best practise, that everyone has a few decades of experience being on the giving or receiving end of a financial audit. The priorities audit reports seem to drive are:

  • Vulnerabilities in financial systems. The whole audit hierarchy was created around financial controls, and so sticks close to financial systems when venturing into IT's space. Detailed and complex collusion possibilities will be discussed when approving payments, but the fact that you can reset anyone's password at the helpdesk is sometimes missed, and more advanced attacks like token hijacking are often ignored.
  • Audit house priorities. Audit houses get driven just like anyone else. While I wasn't around for Enron, the reverberations could still be felt years later when I worked at one. What's more, audit houses are increasingly finding revenue coming from consulting gigs and need to keep their smart people happy. This leads to external audit selling "add-ons" like identity management audits (sometimes, they're even incentivised to).
  • Auditor skills. The auditor you get could be an amazing business process auditor but useless when it comes to infosec, but next year it could be the other way around. It's equally possibly with internal audit. Thus, the strengths of the auditor will determine where you get nailed the hardest.
  • The Rotation plan. This year system X, next year system Y. It doesn't mean system X has gotten better, just that they moved on. If you spend your year responding to the audit on system Y and ignore X, you'll miss vital stuff.
  • Known systems. External and internal auditors don't know IT's business in detail. There could be all sorts of critical systems (or pivot points) that are ignored because they weren't in the "flow of financial information" spread sheet.
Vendors Security vendors are the love to hate people in the infosec world. Thinking of them invokes pictures of greasy salesmen phoning your CIO to ask if your security chumps have even thought about network admission control (true story). On the other hand if you've ever been a small team trying to secure a large org, you'll know you can't do it without automation and at some point you'll need to purchase some products. Their marketing and sales people get all over the place and end up driving controls; whether it's “management by in-flight magazine”, an idea punted at a sponsored conference, or the result of a sales meeting.

But security vendors prioritisation of controls are driven by:

  • New Problems. Security products that work eventually get deployed everywhere they're going to be deployed. They continue to bring in income, but the vendor needs a new bright shiny thing they can take to their existing market and sell. Thus, new problems become new scary things that they can use to push product. Think of the Gartner hype curve. Whatever they're selling, be it DLP, NAC, DAM, APT prevention or IPS if your firewall works more like a switch and your passwords are all "P@55w0rd" then you've got other problems to focus on first.
  • Overinflated problems. Some problems really aren't as big as they're made out to be by vendors, but making them look big is a key part of the sell. Even vendors who don't mean to overinflate end up doing it just because they spend all day thinking of ways to justify (even legitimate) purchases.
  • Products as solutions. Installing a product designed to help with a problem isn't the same as fixing the problem, and vendors aren't great at seeing that (some are). Take patch management solutions, there are some really awesome, mature products out there, but if you can't work out where your machines are, how many there are or get creds to them, then you've got a long way to go before that product starts solving the problem it's supposed to.
Pentesters

Every year around Black Hat Vegas/Pwn2Own/AddYourConfHere time a flurry of media reports hit the public and some people go into panic mode. I remember The DNS bug, where all that was needed was for people to apply a patch, but which, due to the publicity around it, garnered a significant amount of interest from people who it usually wouldn't, and probably shouldn't have cared so much. But many pentesters trade on this publicity; and some pentesting companies use this instead of a marketing budget. That's not their only, or primary, motivation, and in the end things get fixed, new techniques shared and the world a better place. The cynical view then is that some of the motivations for vulnerability researchers, and what they end up prioritising are:

  • New Attacks. This is somewhat similar to the vendors optimising for "new problems" but not quite the same. When Errata introduced Hamster at ToorCon ‘07, I heard tales of people swearing at them from the back. I wasn't there, but I imagine some of the calls were because Layer 2 attacks have been around and well known for over a decade now. Many of us ignored FireSheep for the same reason, even if it motivated the biggest moves to SSL yet. But vuln researchers and the scene aren't interested, it needs to be shiny, new and leet . This focus on the new, and the press it drives, has defenders running around trying to fix new problems, when they haven't fixed the old ones.
  • Complex Attacks. Related to the above, a new attack can't be really basic to do well, it needs to involve considerable skill. When Mark Dowd released his highly complex flash attack, he was rightly given much kudos. An XSS attack on the other hand, was initially ignored by many. However, one lead to a wide class of prevalent vulns, while the other requires you to be, well, Mark Dowd. This mean some of the issues that should be obvious, that underpin core infrastructure, but that aren't sexy, don't get looked at.
  • Shiny Attacks. Some attacks are just really well presented and sexy. Barnaby Jack had an ATM spitting out cash and flashing "Jackpot", that's cool, and it gets a room packed full of people to hear his talk. Hopefully it lead to an improvement in security of some of the ATMs he targeted, but the vulns he exploited were the kinds of things big banks had mostly resolved already, and how many people in the audience actually worked in ATM security? I'd be interested to see if the con budget from banks increased the year of his talk, even if they didn't, I suspect many a banker went to his talk instead of one that was maybe talking about a more prevalent or relevant class of vulnerabilities their organisation may experience. Something Thinkst says much better here.
Individual Experience

Unfortunately, as human beings, our decisions are coloured by a bunch of things, which cause us to make decisions either influenced or defined by factors other than the reality we are faced with. A couple of those lead us to prioritising different security motives if decision making rests solely with one person:

  • Past Experience. Human beings develop through learning and consequences. When you were a child and put your hand on a stove hot plate, you got burned and didn't do it again. It's much the same every time you get burned by a security incident, or worse, internal political incident. There's nothing wrong with this, and it's why we value experience; people who've been burned enough times not to let mistakes happen again. However, it does mean time may be spent preventing a past wrong, rather than focusing on the most likely current wrong. For example, one company I worked with insisted on an overly burdensome set of controls to be placed between servers belonging to their security team and the rest of the company network. The reason for this was due to a previous incident years earlier, where one of these servers had been the source of a Slammer outbreak. While that network was never again a source of a virus outbreak, their network still got hit by future outbreaks from normal users, via the VPN, from business partners etc. In this instance, past experience was favoured over a comprehensive approach to the actual problem, not just the symptom.
  • New Systems. Usually, the time when the most budget is available to work on a system is during its initial deployment. This is equally true of security, and the mantra is for security to be built in at the beginning. Justifying a chunk of security work on the mainframe that's been working fine for the last 10 years on the other hand is much harder, and usually needs to hook into an existing project. The result is that it's easier to get security built into new projects than to force an organisation to make significant “security only” changes to existing systems. The result in those that present the vulnerabilities pentesters know and love get less frequently fixed.
  • Individual Motives. We're complex beings with all sorts of drivers and motivations, maybe you want to get home early to spend some time with your kids, maybe you want to impress Bob from Payroll. All sorts of things can lead to a decision that isn't necessarily the right security one. More relevantly however, security tends to operate in a fairly segmented matter, while some aspects are “common wisdom”, others seem rarely discussed. For example, the way the CISO of Car Manufacturer A and the CISO of Car Manufacturer B set up their controls and choose their focus could be completely different, but beyond general industry chit-chat, there will be little detailed discussion of how they're securing integration to their dealership network. They rely on consultants, who've seen both sides for that. Even then, one consultant may think that monitoring is the most important control at the moment, while another could think mobile security is it.
So What?

The result of all of this is that different companies and people push vastly different agendas. To figure out a strategic approach to security in your organisation, you need some objective risk based measurement that will help you secure stuff in an order that mirrors the actual risk to your environment. While it's still a black art, I believe that Threat Modelling helps a lot here, a sufficiently comprehensive methodology that takes into account all of your infrastructure (or at least admits the existence of risk contributed by systems outside of a “most critical” list) and includes valid perspectives from above tries to provide an objective version of reality that isn't as vulnerable to the single biases described above.

Fri, 19 Aug 2011

SensePost @ 44Con - Join us!

Until recently, there was a distinct lack of decent, high-quality technical security conferences held in the United Kingdom. Home to the Global Financial Centre, London, there isn't a shortage of industries who require secure applications and rely on secure infrastructure and applications to operate.

With this in mind, 44Con is the first combined information security conference and training event held in Central London. The con will provide business and technical tracks, aimed at government, public sector, financial, security professionals and Chief Security Officers.

SensePost will be attending the conference, with Ian de Villiers giving a ground-breaking talk on intercepting and modifying the protocol used by SAP GUI, including the release of a tool that facilitates assessments of said protocol. In addition, Ian and Daniel Cuthbert will be delivering a training course aimed at educating developers, and those involved in the deployments and life-cycle of applications, on the correct approaches required to protect applications from common threats.

Unlike other developer-centric courses, developers will actively be involved in breaking into their fellow students applications, whilst they try and prevent the attacks from taking place.

44Con will be held at the Grange City Hotel in London on the 30th August until the 2nd September.

Register to train with SensePost at 44Con.