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Thu, 19 Jun 2014

Release the hounds! Snoopy 2.0

theHounds
Friday the 13th seemed like as good a date as any to release Snoopy 2.0 (aka snoopy-ng). For those in a rush, you can download the source from GitHub, follow the README.md file, and ask for help on this mailing list. For those who want a bit more information, keep reading.

What is Snoopy?


Snoopy is a distributed, sensor, data collection, interception, analysis, and visualization framework. It is written in a modular format, allowing for the collection of arbitrary signals from various devices via Python plugins.


It was originally released as a PoC at 44Con 2012, but this version is a complete re-write, is 99% Python, modular, and just feels better. The 'modularity' is possibly the most important improvement, for reasons which will become apparent shortly.


Tell me more!


We've presented our ongoing work with snoopy at a bunch of conferences under the title 'The Machines that Betrayed Their Masters'. The general synopsis of this research is that we all carry devices with us that emit wireless signals that could be used to:

  • Uniquely identify the device / collection of devices

  • Discover information about the owner (you!)


This new version of snoopy extends this into other areas of RFID such as; Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GSM, NFC, RFID, ZigBee, etc. The modular design allows each of these to be implemented as a python module. If you can write Python code to interface with a tech, you can slot it into a snoopy-ng plugin.


We've also made it much easier to run Snoopy by itself, rather than requiring a server to sync to as the previous version did. However, Snoopy is still a distributed framework and allows the deployment of numerous Snoopy devices over some large area, having them all sync their data back to one central server (or numerous hops through multiple devices and/or servers). We've been working on other protocols for data synchronisation too - such as XBee. The diagram below illustrates one possible setup:


Architecture Diagram

OK - but how do I use it?


I thought you'd never ask! It's fairly straight forward.

Hardware Requirements


Snoopy should run on most modern computers capable of running Linux, with the appropriate physical adapters for the protocols you're interested in. We've tested it on:

  • Laptop

  • Nokia N900 (with some effort)

  • Raspberry Pi (SnooPi!)

  • BeagleBone Black (BeagleSnoop!)


In terms of hardware peripherals, we've been experimenting with the following:
TechnologyHardwareRange
Wi-FiAWUS 036H100m
BluetoothUbertooth50m
ZigBeeDigi Xbee1km to 80kms
GSMRTL2832U SDR35kms
RFIDRFidler15cm
NFCACR122U10cm


The distances can be increased with appropriate antennas. More on that in a later blog post.

Software Requirements


Essentially a Linux environment is required, but of more importance are the dependencies. These are mostly Python packages. We've tested Snoopy on Kali 1.x, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. We managed to get it working on Maemo (N900) too. We're investigating getting it running on OpenWRT/ddWRT. Please let us know if you have success.

Installation


It should be as simple as:
git clone https://github.com/sensepost/snoopy-ng.git
cd snoopy-ng
bash ./install.sh

Usage


Run Snoopy with the command 'snoopy', and accept the License Agreement. We'd recommend you refer to the README.md file for more information, but here are a few examples to get you going:


1. To save data from the wireless, sysinfo, and heartbeat plugins locally:

snoopy -v -m wifi:iface=wlanX,mon=True -m sysinfo -m heartbeat -d <drone name> -l <location name>

2. To sync data from a client to a server:


Server:

snoopy_auth --create <drone name> # Create account
snoopy -v -m server # Start server plugin

Client:
snoopy -v -m wifi:iface=mon0 -s http://<server hostname>:9001/ -d <drone name> -l <location name> -k

Data Visualization


Maltego is the preferred tool to perform visualisation, and where the beauty of Snoopy is revealed. See the README.md for instructions on how to use it.

I heard Snoopy can fly?


You heard right! Well, almost right. He's more of a passenger on a UAV:



There sure is a lot of stunt hacking in the media these days, with people taking existing hacks and duct-taping them to a cheap drone for media attention. We were concerned to see stories on snoopy airborne take on some of this as the message worked its way though the media. What's the benefit of having Snoopy airborne, then? We can think of a few reasons:


  1. Speed: We can canvas a large area very quickly (many square kilometres)

  2. Stealth: At 80m altitude the UAV is out of visual/audible range

  3. Security: It's possible to bypass physical security barriers (walls, men with guns, dogs)

  4. TTL (Tag, Track, Locate): It's possible to search for a known signature, and follow it


We're exploring the aerial route a whole lot. Look out for our DefCon talk in August for more details.

Commercial Use


The license under which Snoopy is released forbids gaining financially from its use (see LICENSE.txt). We have a separate license available for commercial use, which includes extra functionality such as:

  • Syncing data via XBee

  • Advanced plugins

  • Extra/custom transforms

  • Web interface

  • Prebuilt drones


Get in contact (glenn@sensepost.com / research@sensepost.com) if you'd like to engage with us.

Tue, 20 May 2014

Wireless Bootcamp Training - Las Vegas

Get some.


Wireless hacking, you say?
You may think wireless hacking is nothing new, and you may think it's just not that relevant or exciting. Come along to our BlackHat Wireless Bootcamp course and we'll show you different! We'll teach you the fundamentals every wireless hacker needs to know, but then move onto the really exciting, cutting edge stuff.



Cutting edge WiFi hacking, you say?
At SensePost we really enjoy wireless hacking - mostly because it gets us good results in terms of compromising our targets! With our years of experience in this area we've written our own tools, as well as refined others. In this course we'll reveal new techniques and tools (can you smell 0day?) that we'll hopefully be presenting at the conference, and give you exclusive hands on training with our very own Snoopy framework (a distributed, tracking, data interception, and profiling framework). Two lucky students who capture our CTFs will also go home with pre-built Snoopy drone. Every student will also get their own Alfa WiFi card to take home, as well as the latest Snoopy pre-release (Snoopy will run fine on your laptop too).

Snoopy Drone


What else?
Here's an exact break down of what to expect from this course:
• Wi-Fi theory and background
• Breaking WEP
• Breaking WPA PSK
• Man in the middle attacks for WPA MGT (new attack vectors)
• Breaking WPS
• Wi-Fi Router back doors
• Rogue Access Points attack scenarios (new attack vectors)
• Exclusive Snoopy training


Who should attend?
Anyone interested in WiFi security. The course is relevant for both attackers and defenders (it'll let you put your defense into context). Students should have some technical ability in Linux, and understand networking fundamentals, but this is a bootcamp level course.


Dominic (@singe) and Glenn (@glennzw) will be your instructors. They're both avid wireless hackers, and never leave home without a high gain antenna and an Alfa card! They're looking forward to training you. You can find the sign-up page here.


-Glenn & Dominic

Mon, 7 Apr 2014

SenseCon 2014

L1000617
What originally started as one of those "hey, wouldn't this be cool?" ideas, has blossomed into a yearly event for us at SensePost. SenseCon is a time for all of us to descend on South Africa and spend a week, learning/hacking/tinkering/breaking/building, together and in person.


A few years ago we made the difficult, and sometimes painful, shift to enable remote working in preparation for the opening of our UK and Cape Town offices. Some of you probably think this is a no-brainer, but the benefit of being in the same room as your fellow hackers can't be overlooked. Being able to call everyone over to view an epic hack, or to ask for a hand when stuck is something tools like Skype fail to provide. We've put a lot of time into getting the tech and processes in place to give us the "hackers in the same room" feel, but this needs to be backed with some IRL interaction too.


People outside of our industry seem to think of "technical" people as the opposite of "creative" people. However, anyone who's slung even a small amount of code, or even dabbled in hacking will know this isn't true. We give our analysts "20% time" each month to give that creativity an outlet (or to let on-project creativity get developed further). This is part of the intention of SenseCon: a week of space and time for intense learning, building, and just plain tinkering without the stresses of report deadlines or anything else.


But, ideas need input, so we try to organise someone to teach us new tricks. This year that was done by Schalk from House 4 Hack (these guys rocks) who gave us some electronic and Arduino skills and some other internal trainings. Also, there's something about an all-nighter that drives creativity, so much so that some Plakkers used to make sure they did one at least once a month. We use our hackathon for that.


Our hackathon's setup is similar to others - you get to pitch an idea, see if you can get two other team mates on board, and have 24 hours to complete it. We had some coolness come out of this last year and I was looking forward to seeing what everyone would come up with this time round.


L1000662


Copious amounts of energy drinks, snacks, biltong and chocolates were on supply and it started after dinner together. The agreed projects were are listed below, with some vagueness, since this was internal after all :)


  • pORTAL anonymous comms device - Sam & Dr Frans


Getting a modified version of Grug's pORTAL device working on a Beagle Bone and Rasperry Pi for us to use while traveling.

  • Video Conferencing - Craig and Marc


For video conferencing we normally use a combination of Skype, Go-To-Meeting, Google hangouts, or a page long gstreamer command piped over a netcat tunnel (I'm not kidding). Craig and Marc built an internal video conferencing solution with some other internal comms tools on the side.

  • SensePost Radar - Keiran and Dane


SensePost Radar
SensePost Radar


Keiran and Dane put our office discone antenna to good use and implemented some SDR-fu to pick up aeroplane transponder signals and decode them. They didn't find MH370, but we now have a cool plane tracker for SP.


  • WiFi Death Flag - Charl


Charl, so incredibly happy!!
Charl, so incredibly happy!!


Using wifi-deauth packets can be useful if you want to knock a station (or several) off a wifi network. Say you wanted to prevent some cheap wifi cams from picking you up ... Doing this right can get complicated when you're sitting a few km's away with a yagi and some binoculars. Charl got an arduino to raise a flag when it was successfully deauthed, and lower it when connectivity is restored for use in a wifi-shootout game.


  • Burp Collaboration tool - Jurgens, Johan & Willem


Inspired by Maltego Teeth, Jurgens set about building a way to have multiple analysts collaborate on one Burp session using a secure Jabber transport. He and Johan got this working well, and we will be releasing it and several other Burp apps during the ITWeb Security Summit in Johannesburg in May.

  • How to Pwn a Country - Panda and Sara


YMCA pwnage
YMCA pwnage


Panda (Jeremy) and Sara ended up building local Maltego transforms that would allow mass/rapid scanning of large netblocks so you can quickly zoom in on the most vulnerable boxes. No countries were harmed in the making of this.


  • Bender - Vladislav


While doing client-side engagements, we realised we needed our own payload to help us to better move from spear-phish to persistent internal network access. Earlier in the year, Vlad put our hacks into a professional SensePost beaconing payload he called Bender. During the hackathon he extended its capability in some key areas.

  • Oh-day stuffs - Georg and Etienne


He likes his ice-cream
He likes his ice-cream


gcp and et decided on some good ol'fashioned fuzz-n-find bug hunting on a commercial mail platform, and websense. Along the way they learned some interesting lessons in how not to fuzz, but in the end found some coolness.


  • 3d Printer - Rogan


Rogan finally got around to putting his 3D printer together! He hasn't printed an SP logo yet, but we're assuming this is the most logical first print.

  • Rogue AP - Dominic & Ian


In preparation for our BlackHat submission, singe and ian spent some time researching our new wifi attacks. This resulted in a key new finding and implementation of their new KARMA rogue-ap attack.

  • The challenge - Daniel


I too had to show that I still had tech skills (not all spreadsheeting you know) and created a challenge to send our peeps down the rabbit hole while pushing their skills but also awaken some old school hacking approaches.


L1000686


The hackathon went gangbusters; most of the team went through the night and into the morning (I didn't, getting old and crashed at 2am). Returning that morning to see everyone still hacking away on their projects (and a few hacking away on their snoring) was amazing.


Once the 24-hours was up, many left the office to grab a shower and refresh before having to present to the entire company later on that afternoon.


Overall this years SenseCon was a great success. Some cool projects/ideas were born, a good time was had AND we even made Charl feel young again. As the kids would say, #winning


 


 


 


 

Thu, 12 Dec 2013

Never mind the spies: the security gaps inside your phone

For the last year, Glenn and I have been obsessed with our phones; especially with regard to the data being leaked by a device that is always with you, powered on and often provided with a fast Internet connection. From this obsession, the Snoopy framework was born and released.


After 44con this year, Channel 4 contacted us to be part of a new experimental show named 'Data Baby', whose main goal is to grab ideas from the security community, and transform them into an easy-to-understand concept screened to the public during the 7 o'clock news.


Their request was simple: Show us the real threat!


To fulfil their request, we setup Snoopy to intercept, profile and access data from a group of "victim" students at a location in Central London. While this is something we've done extensively over the past twelve months, we've never had to do it with a television crew and cameras watching your every move!


The venue, Evans and Peel Detective Agency, added to the sinister vibe with their offices literally located underground. We were set up in a secret room behind a book case like friggin spies and got the drones ready for action. As the students arrived, we had a single hour to harvest as much information as we could. Using Snoopy, Maltego and a whole lot of frantic clicks and typing (hacking under stress is not easy), we were filmed gaining access to their inbox's and other personal information.


In the end, Snoopy and Maltego delivered the goods and Glenn added a little charm for the ladies.



After the segment was aired, we participated in a live Twitter Q&A session with viewers (so, so many viewers, we had to tag in others to help reply to all the tweets) and gave advice on how they could prevent themselves from being the next victim. Our advice to them, and indeed anyone else concerned is:


How to avoid falling foul of mobile phone snooping
- Be discerning about when you switch Wi-Fi on
- Check which Wi-Fi network you're connecting to; if you're connecting to Starbucks when you're nowhere near a branch, something's wrong
- Download the latest updates for your phone's operating system, and keep the apps updated too
- Check your application providers (like e-mail) security settings to make sure all your email traffic is "encrypted", not just the login process
- Tell your phone to forget networks once you're done with them, and be careful about joining "open" aka "unencrypted" networks

Thu, 5 Sep 2013

44CON 2013

In one week, it's 44CON time again! One of our favourite UK hacker cons. In keeping with our desire to make more hackers, we're giving several sets of training courses as well as a talk this year.


Training: Hacking by Numbers - Mobile Edition


If you're in a rush, you can book here.


We launched it at Blackhat USA, and nobody threw anything rotting, in-fact some said it went pretty well; our latest addition to the Hacking by Numbers training.


We created the course to share our experience testing mobile applications and platforms, and well, because lots of people asked us to. The course shows you how to test mobile platforms and installed applications for vulnerabilities. HBN Mobile provides a pretty complete and practical overview into the methods used when attacking mobile platforms and presents you with a methodology that can be applied across platforms (although we focus on iOS and Android). This course is mostly for existing penetration testers who are new to the mobile area looking to learn how to understand, analyse and audit applications on various mobile platforms.


For more information about the course, and to book a place, head over here.


Workshop: Malware Reverse Engineering


If we were marketing to hipsters, we'd use words like “bespoke” and “handcrafted” to describe this workshop. While it's not made out of yams, it was put together especially for 44con.


Inaki and Siavosh's workshop will cut through the black-magic often associated with reverse engineering and malware. Advanced attacks usually have some form of malware involved, and learning to pull these apart to understand the kill chain is an increasingly vital skill.


Using real malware used in attacks against large corporates, students will look at both behavioural analysis and code analysis, to determine what the malware does.


If you're keen to attend, speak to the 44con crew at the front desk on arrival.


Talk: 'Honey, I'm Home' - Hacking Zwave Home Automation Systems


Behrang and Sahand will be presenting the results of their research into smart homes on day two at 09:30am.


“Smart homes” employing a variety of home automation systems are becoming increasingly common. Heating, ventilation, security and entertainment systems are centrally controlled with a mixture of wired and wireless networking. In 2011 the UK market for home automation products was estimated at GBP 65 million, an increase of 12% on the previous year, with the US market exceeding $3 billion. Zigbee and Z-Wave wireless protocols underpin most home automation systems. Z-Wave is growing in popularity as it does not conflict with existing 2.4GHz WiFi and Bluetooth systems.


Their talk describes the Z-Wave protocol and a number of weaknesses, including how to build a low-cost attack kit to perform packet capture and injection, along with potential attacks on the AES crypto implementation. Bottom line: they can walk up to a house, disable security sensors, then open the front door. LIKE A BOSS