Grey bar Blue bar
Share this:

Sun, 17 Aug 2014

DefCon 22 - Practical Aerial Hacking & Surveillance

Hello from Las Vegas! Yesterday (ed: uh, last week, my bad) I gave a talk at DefCon 22 entitled 'Practical Aerial Hacking & Surveillance'. If you missed the talk the slides are available here. Also, I'm releasing a paper I wrote as part of the talk entitled 'Digital Terrestrial Tracking: The Future of Surveillance', click here to download it.


Whiskey shot!
Whiskey shot!


The Snoopy code is available on our GitHub account, and you can join the mailing list here. Also, congratulations to @AmandersLPD for winning our #SnoopySensor competition! You can see the output of our *amazing* PRNG in action below:

defConWinrar
I'll update this post to point to the DefCon video once they're released. In the meantime, the specifications of my custom quadcopter I had on stage are below:


Part    Type    Link
Frame DJI F450 http://www.uavproducts.com/product.php?id_product=25
Flight Controller APM 2.6 https://store.3drobotics.com/products/apm-2-6-kit-1
ESCs DJI 30A http://www.dronesvision.net/en/dji-f330-f450-f550/365-dji-esc-30a-opto-brushless-speed-controller-for-f330-f450-f550.html
Motors DJI 920KV http://www.ezdrone.com/product/dji-2212920kv-brushless-motor/
Radio Turnigy 9x http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__8992__turnigy_9x_9ch_transmitter_w_module_8ch_receiver_mode_2_v2_firmware_.html
Radio TX HawkEye 1W http://www.aliexpress.com/item/433Mhz-HawkEYE-openLRSngTX-UHF-system-JR-Turnigy-compatible-and-433MHz-9Ch-Receiver/1194330930.html
Radio RX HawkEye 6ch http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/DTF-UHF-6-channel-long-range-receiver-By-HawkEYE/933311_1511029537.html
FPV Camera Sony 600 http://www.tecnic.co.uk/Sony-600-TVL-CCD-Mini-Camera.html
Video TX 600mw http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__17507__immersionrc_5_8ghz_audio_video_transmitter_fatshark_compatible_600mw_.html
OSD Minimosd https://store.3drobotics.com/products/apm-minimosd-rev-1-1
HD Camera GoPro3+ Black http://gopro.com/cameras/hd-hero3-black-edition
Goggles SkyZone http://www.foxtechfpv.com/skyzone-fpv-goggles-p-1218.html
FC GPS uBlox GPS https://store.3drobotics.com/products/3dr-gps-ublox-with-compass
Lost quad GPS Fi-Li-Fi http://uavision.co.uk/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=54
Payload BeagleBone Black https://github.com/sensepost/snoopy-ng

Fri, 27 Jun 2014

The SensePost Academy: Wrecking Balls

There is a serious skills shortage in our industry. There are just not enough skilled hackers out there to fill all the open positions. In November of last year, I proposed a new approach for us at SensePost to address these concerns. I looked at what we could do as a company to ensure the next generation of hackers were being educated correctly (no, it's not about how you use a tool) and moulded into what we, at SensePost, perceive to be good penetration testers.


I termed this the SensePost Academy and it is a structured training programme for all new recruits looking at a life at SensePost in the Assessment team. It is a combination of basic technical + offensive attack approaches and client interaction skills that provide an excellent stepping stone for those looking at starting a career as a penetration tester. The academy runs for a period of six months, finishing with a final culminating exercise (CULEX) before the decision is made to accept the recruit into the assessment team as an unmonitored penetration tester. The SensePost Academy Review Board (SARB) oversees each recruit and is responsible for grading and testing the recruit on each phase, in addition to mentoring (or should that be tormenting?) them.


Interviews were performed, we wanted the right recruit and had to turn down a lot of people in the process, but we did find two gentlemen, and as a team, decided on our first ever recruits:


wreckingballs
On their first day, we reminded them that they were recruits and as a result, needed a special theme tune:



This theme tune would be played whenever they were addressed and as often as possible.


Over the past six months, they've been on many training courses internally, been shown the ways of the pwnage by the assessment team, presented at conferences and also developed and broken applications. Each phase was carefully monitored by the review board to ensure they were being moulded into a form we felt was right.


Finally, the CULEX week was upon us. A client application assessment (fictitious German company) and client feedback meeting. No hand holding, just perform the test like you've been shown and don't mess up.


After making them sweat, we took a vote this morning and I'm happy to welcome both Johan and Dane to our assessments team as Junior penetration testers.


If you think you'd be a good addition to the next academy intake, we've love to hear from you. Tweet us on @sensepost or email us at jobs@sensepost.com

Fri, 13 Jun 2014

Release the hounds! Snoopy 2.0

theHounds
Friday the 13th seemed like as good a date as any to release Snoopy 2.0 (aka snoopy-ng). For those in a rush, you can download the source from GitHub, follow the README.md file, and ask for help on this mailing list. For those who want a bit more information, keep reading.

What is Snoopy?


Snoopy is a distributed, sensor, data collection, interception, analysis, and visualization framework. It is written in a modular format, allowing for the collection of arbitrary signals from various devices via Python plugins.


It was originally released as a PoC at 44Con 2012, but this version is a complete re-write, is 99% Python, modular, and just feels better. The 'modularity' is possibly the most important improvement, for reasons which will become apparent shortly.


Tell me more!


We've presented our ongoing work with snoopy at a bunch of conferences under the title 'The Machines that Betrayed Their Masters'. The general synopsis of this research is that we all carry devices with us that emit wireless signals that could be used to:

  • Uniquely identify the device / collection of devices

  • Discover information about the owner (you!)


This new version of snoopy extends this into other areas of RFID such as; Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GSM, NFC, RFID, ZigBee, etc. The modular design allows each of these to be implemented as a python module. If you can write Python code to interface with a tech, you can slot it into a snoopy-ng plugin.


We've also made it much easier to run Snoopy by itself, rather than requiring a server to sync to as the previous version did. However, Snoopy is still a distributed framework and allows the deployment of numerous Snoopy devices over some large area, having them all sync their data back to one central server (or numerous hops through multiple devices and/or servers). We've been working on other protocols for data synchronisation too - such as XBee. The diagram below illustrates one possible setup:


Architecture Diagram

OK - but how do I use it?


I thought you'd never ask! It's fairly straight forward.

Hardware Requirements


Snoopy should run on most modern computers capable of running Linux, with the appropriate physical adapters for the protocols you're interested in. We've tested it on:

  • Laptop

  • Nokia N900 (with some effort)

  • Raspberry Pi (SnooPi!)

  • BeagleBone Black (BeagleSnoop!)


In terms of hardware peripherals, we've been experimenting with the following:
TechnologyHardwareRange
Wi-FiAWUS 036H100m
BluetoothUbertooth50m
ZigBeeDigi Xbee1km to 80kms
GSMRTL2832U SDR35kms
RFIDRFidler15cm
NFCACR122U10cm


The distances can be increased with appropriate antennas. More on that in a later blog post.

Software Requirements


Essentially a Linux environment is required, but of more importance are the dependencies. These are mostly Python packages. We've tested Snoopy on Kali 1.x, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. We managed to get it working on Maemo (N900) too. We're investigating getting it running on OpenWRT/ddWRT. Please let us know if you have success.

Installation


It should be as simple as:
git clone https://github.com/sensepost/snoopy-ng.git
cd snoopy-ng
bash ./install.sh

Usage


Run Snoopy with the command 'snoopy', and accept the License Agreement. We'd recommend you refer to the README.md file for more information, but here are a few examples to get you going:


1. To save data from the wireless, sysinfo, and heartbeat plugins locally:

snoopy -v -m wifi:iface=wlanX,mon=True -m sysinfo -m heartbeat -d <drone name> -l <location name>

2. To sync data from a client to a server:


Server:

snoopy_auth --create <drone name> # Create account
snoopy -v -m server # Start server plugin

Client:
snoopy -v -m wifi:iface=mon0 -s http://<server hostname>:9001/ -d <drone name> -l <location name> -k

Data Visualization


Maltego is the preferred tool to perform visualisation, and where the beauty of Snoopy is revealed. See the README.md for instructions on how to use it.

I heard Snoopy can fly?


You heard right! Well, almost right. He's more of a passenger on a UAV:



There sure is a lot of stunt hacking in the media these days, with people taking existing hacks and duct-taping them to a cheap drone for media attention. We were concerned to see stories on snoopy airborne take on some of this as the message worked its way though the media. What's the benefit of having Snoopy airborne, then? We can think of a few reasons:


  1. Speed: We can canvas a large area very quickly (many square kilometres)

  2. Stealth: At 80m altitude the UAV is out of visual/audible range

  3. Security: It's possible to bypass physical security barriers (walls, men with guns, dogs)

  4. TTL (Tag, Track, Locate): It's possible to search for a known signature, and follow it


We're exploring the aerial route a whole lot. Look out for our DefCon talk in August for more details.

Commercial Use


The license under which Snoopy is released forbids gaining financially from its use (see LICENSE.txt). We have a separate license available for commercial use, which includes extra functionality such as:

  • Syncing data via XBee

  • Advanced plugins

  • Extra/custom transforms

  • Web interface

  • Prebuilt drones


Get in contact (glenn@sensepost.com / research@sensepost.com) if you'd like to engage with us.

Fri, 9 May 2014

Wireless Bootcamp Training - Las Vegas

Get some.


Wireless hacking, you say?
You may think wireless hacking is nothing new, and you may think it's just not that relevant or exciting. Come along to our BlackHat Wireless Bootcamp course and we'll show you different! We'll teach you the fundamentals every wireless hacker needs to know, but then move onto the really exciting, cutting edge stuff.



Cutting edge WiFi hacking, you say?
At SensePost we really enjoy wireless hacking - mostly because it gets us good results in terms of compromising our targets! With our years of experience in this area we've written our own tools, as well as refined others. In this course we'll reveal new techniques and tools (can you smell 0day?) that we'll hopefully be presenting at the conference, and give you exclusive hands on training with our very own Snoopy framework (a distributed, tracking, data interception, and profiling framework). Two lucky students who capture our CTFs will also go home with pre-built Snoopy drone. Every student will also get their own Alfa WiFi card to take home, as well as the latest Snoopy pre-release (Snoopy will run fine on your laptop too).

Snoopy Drone


What else?
Here's an exact break down of what to expect from this course:
• Wi-Fi theory and background
• Breaking WEP
• Breaking WPA PSK
• Man in the middle attacks for WPA MGT (new attack vectors)
• Breaking WPS
• Wi-Fi Router back doors
• Rogue Access Points attack scenarios (new attack vectors)
• Exclusive Snoopy training


Who should attend?
Anyone interested in WiFi security. The course is relevant for both attackers and defenders (it'll let you put your defense into context). Students should have some technical ability in Linux, and understand networking fundamentals, but this is a bootcamp level course.


Dominic (@singe) and Glenn (@glennzw) will be your instructors. They're both avid wireless hackers, and never leave home without a high gain antenna and an Alfa card! They're looking forward to training you. You can find the sign-up page here.


-Glenn & Dominic

Wed, 12 Feb 2014

RAT-a-tat-tat

Hey all,


So following on from my talk (slides, video) I am releasing the NMAP service probes and the Poison Ivy NSE script as well as the DarkComet config extractor.



An example of finding and extracting Camellia key from live Poison Ivy C2's:
nmap -sV -Pn --versiondb=nmap-service-probes.pi --script=poison-ivy.nse <ip_address/range)
Finding Poison Ivy, DarkComet and/or Xtreme RAT C2's:
nmap -sV -Pn --versiondb=nmap-service-probes.pi <ip_range>


If you have any questions, please contact research@sensepost.com
Cheers