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Mon, 23 Feb 2015

Improvements in Rogue AP attacks - MANA 1/2

At Defcon 22 we presented several improvements in wifi rogue access point attacks. We entitled the talk "Manna from heaven" and released the MANA toolkit. I'll be doing two blog entries. The first will describe the improvements made at a wifi layer, and the second will cover the network credential interception stuff. If you just want the goodies, you can get them at the end of this entry for the price of scrolling down.


Introduction


This work is about rogue access points, by which we mean a wireless access point that mimics real ones in an attempt to get users to connect to it. The initial work on this was done in 2004 by Dino dai Zovi and Shaun Macaulay. They realised that the way wifi devices probe for wireless networks that they've "remembered" happens without authentication, and that if a malicious access point merely responds to these directed probes, it can trick wireless clients into connecting to it. They called this a KARMA attack.


Additionally, Josh Wright and Brad Antoniewicz in 2008 worked out that if you man in the middle the EAP authentication on secured networks, you could crack that hash and gain access to the network yourself. They implemented this in freeradius-wpe (wireless pwnage edition).


However, KARMA attacks no longer work well, and we wanted to know why. Also, the WPE stuff seemed ripe for use in rogue access points rather than just for gaining access to the original network. This is what we implemented.


Changes in Probing


After a significant amount of time poring over radio captures of the ways in which various devices probed, and informed by our previous work on Snoopy, we realised two things. The first is that modern devices, particularly mobile ones, won't listen to directed probe responses for open, non-hidden networks if that AP didn't also/first respond to a broadcast probe. What this means is that our rogue access point needs to implement the same. However, the challenge is, what do we respond to the broadcast probe *with*?


To overcome that, we took the existing KARMA functionality built by Digininja, ported it to the latest version of hostapd and extended it to store a view of the "remembered networks" (aka the Preferred Network List (PNL)) for each device it sees. Then when hostapd-mana sees a broadcast probe from that device, it will respond with a directed probe response for each network hostapd-mana knows to be in that device's PNL. This is based on our finding, that wifi clients don't have a problem with a single BSSID (i.e. AP MAC address) to have several ESSIDs (aka SSID aka network name).


Practically, suppose there are two devices, one probing for a network foo, and the other probing for two networks bar and baz. When device1 sends a broadcast probe, hostapd-mana will respond with a directed probe response for foo to device1. Likewise when device2 sends a broadcast probe, hostapd-mana will respond with two directed probe responses to device 2, one for bar and one for baz. In addition, the "normal" KARMA functionality of responding to directed probes will also occur. Practically, we found this significantly improved the effectiveness of our rogue AP.


iOS and hidden networks


iOS presented an interesting challenge to us when it came to hidden networks. A hidden network is one configured not to broadcast its ESSID in either its beacons or broadcast probe response. Practically, the only way a client device can know if the hidden network it has remembered is nearby is by constantly sending out directed probes for the network. This is why hidden networks aren't a very good design, as their clients need to spew their names out all over the place. However, when observing iOS devices, while they could join a hidden network just fine, they seemed to not probe for it most of the time. This had us constructing faraday cages, checking other factors like BSSID and geolocation to no avail. Until we realised that iOS will not probe for any hidden networks in its PNL, unless there is at least one hidden network nearby. So, if you'd like to maximise your rogue'ing, make sure you have a hidden network nearby. It doesn't even need to be a real network; use a mifi, use airbase-ng or just create another hostapd network.


Limits in probing


Modern mobile devices probe for networks on their PNL *significantly* less than laptops or older devices do. In an ideal world, manufacturers would change the implementation to never probe for open network, and only wait for a response to a broadcast, effectively limiting these attacks to requiring pre-knowledge, common networks or being performed in the vicinity of the actual network. Actually, a patch was pushed to wpa_supplicant to limit the stupid probing behaviour Android does in low power mode a few months ago, this will make it into Android proper sometime soon. Also, iOS has significantly reduced how often it probes.


There are two ways to work around this. The first is manual; go for a common network. The rise of city-wide wifi projects makes this somewhat easy. Or if you're going for a corporate network, just do some recon and name one of your access points after that. But, we wanted to make things work better than that. The default behaviour of hostapd-mana is to build up a view of each devices PNL and only respond to broadcasts with networks specific to that device. However, we can remove that limitation and build a global PNL, and respond to each broadcast with every network every device has probed for. We call this loud mode, and it's configurable in the hostapd-mana config. This relies on the fact that many devices, particularly laptops and older mobile devices still probe for networks a lot. It also relies on the fact that many devices have networks in common (have they been in the same city, same airport, same conference, same company, same pocket etc.). This works *very* well in less crowded areas, and you'll get a much higher number of devices connecting.


However, in busy areas, or if your antenna is large enough, you'll quickly exceed the capacity for your average wifi device to respond fast enough to all of the devices, and as the number of response probes grows exponentially with each new device, even in quiet areas over time, this problem crops up (but didn't on stage at Defcon miraculously). So, it's *good enough* for now, but needs an in-kernel or in-firmware implementation with some network ageing to scale a bit better (one of the many opportunities for extending this work if you're up for some open source contribution).


Auto Crack 'n Add


freeradius-wpe is great, it provides a nice way to grab EAP hashes for clients that don't validate certificates presented via EAP's that implement SSL (PEAP, EAP-GTC, PEAL-TTLS). However, the patches are for freeradius v1 and, much like the KARMA patches for hostapd, have aged. But, hostapd contains a radius server, and so we could port the freeradius-wpe work to that, something we based off some initial but incomplete patches by Brad Antoniewicz. So hostapd-mana will also let you grab EAP hashes without needing another tool.


However, the KARMA attacks only work against open wifi networks. EAP networks are increasingly common (especially corporate ones) and we wanted to be able to have a go at getting devices probing for those to connect to our rogue AP. To do this, we modified hostapd-mana to always accept any EAP hash, but send it off for cracking. It simply writes these to a file, from which the simple python tool crackapd (included) will grab it and send it off to another process for cracking. Currently, we use asleap (also by Josh) and the rockyou password list, but these can all be easily modified. For example, to use CloudCracker and its incredibly optimised MS-CHAPv2 cracking setup.


The net result is pretty great for simple EAP hashes. The device will try and connect, and fail as we don't know enough to do the challenge response right. But after the hash is cracked, when it retries to connect (something a device will keep doing) it will succeed (and you'll have your first creds). For simple hashes, this is transparent to the user. Of course, very complex hashes will only work if you crack them in time. Worst case scenario, you leave with hashes.


Conclusion


So that's what we built into hostapd-mana. You get improved KARMA attacks, a modern hostapd version, an integrated hash stealer, and the possibility of rogue'ing some EAP networks. You can get the full toolkit at MANA toolkit on GitHub or our hostapd-mana at hostapd-mana on GitHub.


The next blog entry will cover what we did once we got a device to connect.


The Goodies


The Defcon talk:


The supporting slide deck with more information:


The final toolkit: MANA toolkit on GitHub You can also get this on Kali with "apt-get install mana-toolkit"


The modified hostapd (for hackers or people who want to build their own setup): hostapd-mana on GitHub

Sat, 17 Jan 2015

Commercial Snoopy Launch! [ ShadowLightly ]

Hello world!


We've been busy squireling away on a much requested project - a commercial Snoopy offering. We've called it ShadowLightly, and we'd like to invite you to join the beta explorer program. We're going to offer ten 3-month trials to the site (you'd need to buy sensors / build your own), and in return we'd ask that you help us debug any issues. To apply, please email explorer@shadowlightly.com - introduce yourself, and tell us a little about why you'd like to join the program.


To those who missed the Snoopy party: it's a distributed, tracking, profiling, and data interception framework. It's all open source and you can run your own setup for non-commercial purposes. Here's some more info:
http://www.sensepost.com/blog/10754.html
http://www.sensepost.com/blog/11042.html


How does this ShadowLightly thing work? You'd create an account on our ShadowLightly.com site, register your sensors, run your sensors uploading their data to our server, and then explore the data in both the website and in Maltego. We've built TDS transforms to query the remote data.


Here's a video which may explain it all better:


ShadowLightly Demo


We're looking forward to working with you!

Sun, 17 Aug 2014

DefCon 22 - Practical Aerial Hacking & Surveillance

Hello from Las Vegas! Yesterday (ed: uh, last week, my bad) I gave a talk at DefCon 22 entitled 'Practical Aerial Hacking & Surveillance'. If you missed the talk the slides are available here. Also, I'm releasing a paper I wrote as part of the talk entitled 'Digital Terrestrial Tracking: The Future of Surveillance', click here to download it.


Whiskey shot!
Whiskey shot!


The Snoopy code is available on our GitHub account, and you can join the mailing list here. Also, congratulations to @AmandersLPD for winning our #SnoopySensor competition! You can see the output of our *amazing* PRNG in action below:

defConWinrar
I'll update this post to point to the DefCon video once they're released. In the meantime, the specifications of my custom quadcopter I had on stage are below:


Part    Type    Link
Frame DJI F450 http://www.uavproducts.com/product.php?id_product=25
Flight Controller APM 2.6 https://store.3drobotics.com/products/apm-2-6-kit-1
ESCs DJI 30A http://www.dronesvision.net/en/dji-f330-f450-f550/365-dji-esc-30a-opto-brushless-speed-controller-for-f330-f450-f550.html
Motors DJI 920KV http://www.ezdrone.com/product/dji-2212920kv-brushless-motor/
Radio Turnigy 9x http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__8992__turnigy_9x_9ch_transmitter_w_module_8ch_receiver_mode_2_v2_firmware_.html
Radio TX HawkEye 1W http://www.aliexpress.com/item/433Mhz-HawkEYE-openLRSngTX-UHF-system-JR-Turnigy-compatible-and-433MHz-9Ch-Receiver/1194330930.html
Radio RX HawkEye 6ch http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/DTF-UHF-6-channel-long-range-receiver-By-HawkEYE/933311_1511029537.html
FPV Camera Sony 600 http://www.tecnic.co.uk/Sony-600-TVL-CCD-Mini-Camera.html
Video TX 600mw http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/__17507__immersionrc_5_8ghz_audio_video_transmitter_fatshark_compatible_600mw_.html
OSD Minimosd https://store.3drobotics.com/products/apm-minimosd-rev-1-1
HD Camera GoPro3+ Black http://gopro.com/cameras/hd-hero3-black-edition
Goggles SkyZone http://www.foxtechfpv.com/skyzone-fpv-goggles-p-1218.html
FC GPS uBlox GPS https://store.3drobotics.com/products/3dr-gps-ublox-with-compass
Lost quad GPS Fi-Li-Fi http://uavision.co.uk/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=54
Payload BeagleBone Black https://github.com/sensepost/snoopy-ng

Tue, 5 Aug 2014

SensePost partners with Paterva to offer improved security intelligence

SENSEPOST PNG on clear
We've been big fans of Maltego and the team at Paterva for a very long time now, and we frequently use this powerful tool for all kinds of fun and interesting stuff, like

We go way back with Andrew and Roelof, who was in fact a founder of SensePost, so today we're super excited to be able to announce a new, strengthened partnership with them under which we have been accredited as an Approved Maltego Solutions Provider. Basically this means the that with Paterva's help we plan to use the powerful Maltego toolset to become better at our job - that is to provide information and information systems to our customer with which they can make sound security decisions. Here's the official news:
SensePost today is proud to announce the completion of a contract that will see the company recognized as the world's first “Approved Maltego Solution Provider” (AMSP) and the exclusive provider of this kind in the UK and Southern Africa.


SensePost was founded in 2000 and has developed into one of the worlds leading Information Security Services companies with offices in London, Cape Town and Pretoria. As trusted advisors it has always been our mission to provide our customers with insight, information and systems to enable them to make strong decisions about Information Security that support their business performance. Whilst this mission has traditionally expressed itself in technical security analysis services like Vulnerability Assessment and Penetration Testing we recognise that the threat landscape is constantly changing and that new and more complex realities necessitate the use of sophisticated new skills, tools and techniques with which to support our clients.


“This strategic alliance perfectly fits the ‘Assess-Detect-Protect-Respond' framework that drives the way we design, sell and deliver our service. It's the perfect evolution of our growing services offering.” says Etienne Greef, CEO of the SensePost group holding company SecureData, who's strategy is at the core of this new initiative.


‘Maltego', built by Paterva, is a powerful suite of software tools used for data mining, link analysis and data visualization, giving the user the ability to extract large volumes of data from diverse sources and then analyze it to understand the patterns and relationships it reveals. In the modern digital age these techniques are used to convert data into information and thereby extract concrete value that can be used for effective decision-making.


Maltego is a highly regarded and popular platform used extensively in Open Source Intelligence Gathering, Infrastructure Analysis for Penetration Testing, Cyber Attack Analysis, Fraud Detection and Investigation, Security Intelligence, Information Security Management, Research and more.


This partnership between SensePost and Paterva (who produce the Maltego software) builds on the companies' shared roots and intellectual heritage and will allow both companies to serve their customers and fulfil their respective missions better.


As an AMSP SensePost will be authorised to provide integration, consulting, support and training for the Maltego tools with full endorsement, support and assistance directly from Paterva. This new capability, combined with an existing wealth of information security skills and experience, uniquely positions SensePost to advise and support clients seeking to exploit the unique strategic advantage the Maltego toolset can offer.


More information on our services and capabilities in this space will follow with our official "launch" in a few weeks time. In the mean, here's a brief summary of our new offering.

Thu, 19 Jun 2014

Release the hounds! Snoopy 2.0

theHounds
Friday the 13th seemed like as good a date as any to release Snoopy 2.0 (aka snoopy-ng). For those in a rush, you can download the source from GitHub, follow the README.md file, and ask for help on this mailing list. For those who want a bit more information, keep reading.

What is Snoopy?


Snoopy is a distributed, sensor, data collection, interception, analysis, and visualization framework. It is written in a modular format, allowing for the collection of arbitrary signals from various devices via Python plugins.


It was originally released as a PoC at 44Con 2012, but this version is a complete re-write, is 99% Python, modular, and just feels better. The 'modularity' is possibly the most important improvement, for reasons which will become apparent shortly.


Tell me more!


We've presented our ongoing work with snoopy at a bunch of conferences under the title 'The Machines that Betrayed Their Masters'. The general synopsis of this research is that we all carry devices with us that emit wireless signals that could be used to:

  • Uniquely identify the device / collection of devices

  • Discover information about the owner (you!)


This new version of snoopy extends this into other areas of RFID such as; Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GSM, NFC, RFID, ZigBee, etc. The modular design allows each of these to be implemented as a python module. If you can write Python code to interface with a tech, you can slot it into a snoopy-ng plugin.


We've also made it much easier to run Snoopy by itself, rather than requiring a server to sync to as the previous version did. However, Snoopy is still a distributed framework and allows the deployment of numerous Snoopy devices over some large area, having them all sync their data back to one central server (or numerous hops through multiple devices and/or servers). We've been working on other protocols for data synchronisation too - such as XBee. The diagram below illustrates one possible setup:


Architecture Diagram

OK - but how do I use it?


I thought you'd never ask! It's fairly straight forward.

Hardware Requirements


Snoopy should run on most modern computers capable of running Linux, with the appropriate physical adapters for the protocols you're interested in. We've tested it on:

  • Laptop

  • Nokia N900 (with some effort)

  • Raspberry Pi (SnooPi!)

  • BeagleBone Black (BeagleSnoop!)


In terms of hardware peripherals, we've been experimenting with the following:
TechnologyHardwareRange
Wi-FiAWUS 036H100m
BluetoothUbertooth50m
ZigBeeDigi Xbee1km to 80kms
GSMRTL2832U SDR35kms
RFIDRFidler15cm
NFCACR122U10cm


The distances can be increased with appropriate antennas. More on that in a later blog post.

Software Requirements


Essentially a Linux environment is required, but of more importance are the dependencies. These are mostly Python packages. We've tested Snoopy on Kali 1.x, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. We managed to get it working on Maemo (N900) too. We're investigating getting it running on OpenWRT/ddWRT. Please let us know if you have success.

Installation


It should be as simple as:
git clone https://github.com/sensepost/snoopy-ng.git
cd snoopy-ng
bash ./install.sh

Usage


Run Snoopy with the command 'snoopy', and accept the License Agreement. We'd recommend you refer to the README.md file for more information, but here are a few examples to get you going:


1. To save data from the wireless, sysinfo, and heartbeat plugins locally:

snoopy -v -m wifi:iface=wlanX,mon=True -m sysinfo -m heartbeat -d <drone name> -l <location name>

2. To sync data from a client to a server:


Server:

snoopy_auth --create <drone name> # Create account
snoopy -v -m server # Start server plugin

Client:
snoopy -v -m wifi:iface=mon0 -s http://<server hostname>:9001/ -d <drone name> -l <location name> -k

Data Visualization


Maltego is the preferred tool to perform visualisation, and where the beauty of Snoopy is revealed. See the README.md for instructions on how to use it.

I heard Snoopy can fly?


You heard right! Well, almost right. He's more of a passenger on a UAV:



There sure is a lot of stunt hacking in the media these days, with people taking existing hacks and duct-taping them to a cheap drone for media attention. We were concerned to see stories on snoopy airborne take on some of this as the message worked its way though the media. What's the benefit of having Snoopy airborne, then? We can think of a few reasons:


  1. Speed: We can canvas a large area very quickly (many square kilometres)

  2. Stealth: At 80m altitude the UAV is out of visual/audible range

  3. Security: It's possible to bypass physical security barriers (walls, men with guns, dogs)

  4. TTL (Tag, Track, Locate): It's possible to search for a known signature, and follow it


We're exploring the aerial route a whole lot. Look out for our DefCon talk in August for more details.

Commercial Use


The license under which Snoopy is released forbids gaining financially from its use (see LICENSE.txt). We have a separate license available for commercial use, which includes extra functionality such as:

  • Syncing data via XBee

  • Advanced plugins

  • Extra/custom transforms

  • Web interface

  • Prebuilt drones


Get in contact (glenn@sensepost.com / research@sensepost.com) if you'd like to engage with us.